E-Learning Punk Trends Immersive Learning Augmented Reality Virtual Reality
E-Learning Punk

Is coronavirus bringing immersive learning to the forefront?

Jennifer Fritz explains the potentials that virtual reality offers as the coronavirus crisis continues

Student exchanges in the US, a semester abroad in China – immersion, which can be described as switching to a completely different (language) environment, continues to be the most successful (language) learning method in the world, as well as the one with the most thorough research behind it. It’s no surprise then that virtual reality (VR), which is often mentioned in the same breath as augmented reality (AR), works much the same way.

INFO

While AR enhances our “true” reality with virtual elements, VR is instead designed to fully immerse us in a virtual world.

Needless to say, both immersion and virtual reality have become very relevant topics ever since the coronavirus crisis started. Just think of the number of people setting up Zoom or Skype meetings to stay connected and reduce the isolation that comes with social distancing as much as possible. Now think of the limits of these meetings when it comes to really making eye contact, branching off into one-on-one conversations, and even moving to a different room. That’s where VR can help.

 

Jennifer Fritz has worked as a learning concept designer, storyteller, and consultant for companies such as Virtual Identity AG and imc AG. Her passion is digital learning and teaching, and as a former member of the First German Business Association for Immersive Media (EDFVR), she knows that the future in this area belongs to virtual and augmented reality. In fact, she has seen a trend towards social virtual learning since the beginning of the coronavirus crisis.

A key observation by the concept designer, storyteller, and consultant: “Now we’re suddenly doing things that would have been completely unimaginable just a few weeks ago.”

Hi Jenny! How would you describe the role of augmented reality (AR) and virtual reality (VR) in your day-to-day routine?

Jenny: Well, as you probably know already, both are incredibly exciting new technologies. What’s worth pointing out is the fact that they’re finally seeing some proper development nowadays, and so there’s a lot of room still left for experimenting. When it comes to my personal life, I really like using entertainment applications such as Wonderscope, for experiencing stories in AR, and Beat Saber, which is a rhythm game.

 

In addition, I also work with these technologies whenever it makes sense to do so in my projects. In fact, I can’t overstate just how strongly I believe that AR and VR are both opening entirely new possibilities in terms of learning and storytelling.

 

Now, there are still many clients who are not too keen on the costs or the technology at this point, but I think it’s important to point out that VR in particular can really help us deal with the isolation resulting from social distancing during the coronavirus crisis and give us that sensation of “being there” that you don’t really get when working from home. And it goes without saying that an obvious application is daily VR meetings, but it can also extend far beyond that and include things such as professional development training and even onboarding. Moreover, the importance of this becomes more obvious when we consider that people have now been working from home for weeks and that new employees keep being added, which means that companies that have already implemented VR onboarding training have a clear advantage.

This reference to onboarding is really interesting because, as you’ve pointed out, it’s a new and exciting area of application. Now, it’s probably reasonable to assume that most people think that VR is particularly well-suited to training for high-risk scenarios – what other kind of applications and scenarios are there?

Jenny: Well, like you’ve said, VR is ideal for simulating dangerous situations and processes with valuable raw materials. But it’s important to keep in mind that VR training also makes sense when not enough training stations are available.

 

And once again, I can point out a good example related to the current coronavirus pandemic, this time derived from the fact that it’s a high-risk situation for medical staff. More specifically, a new VR training system has recently been used to train 17,000 doctors and nurses for the COVID-19 pandemic, which is something that would have been completely impossible to do with traditional training given the number of people. Most hospitals are overburdened and don’t really have capacity for urgently needed training, so a virtual space made it possible for the training participants to get their bearings in regard to the new coronavirus reality without having to put their own health, or that of their patients’, at risk. And on top of that, using virtual reality meant that valuable PPE was conserved. So if you think about it, this is a perfect example of every single factor in a single scenario: Compensating for insufficient training stations, conserving crucial raw materials, and providing safe training for a hazardous situation.

 

It’s also important to note that we’re seeing new scenarios that seem to be viable to various degrees arise on almost a daily basis right now. Needless to say, high-risk scenarios and limited capacity have been firmly established as cases where virtual reality training makes sense, but we’ll see others be confirmed as well with time. As I mentioned earlier on, social distancing makes it very likely that we’ll see – at least temporarily – areas in which VR training will replace what would normally have been in-person training, such as communication skills and sales.

You mentioned concerns about cost earlier on. Aren’t AR and VR learning methods incredibly expensive in terms of hardware and content creation? How can someone decide whether it’s really worth it?  

Jenny: With the Oculus Quest’s launch a few months ago, we now have a headset on the market that offers full mobility in a virtual environment and that doesn’t need a PC or external tracking elements – all at a price of 400 euros. This saves additional costs that would normally be associated with equipment, and the head-mounted display (editor’s note: AR glasses) is easy to use. In other words, we have an affordable option for the HMD at least.

 

Now, in regard to content creation, it really comes down to what the company in question wants, and we’re talking from real 360° photos to highly complex 3D animations – I honestly think there’s an option for every budget out there by this point. Basically put, the market has stabilized. Of course, however, it’s important to consider that virtual reality training is really only worth it beyond a certain number of users, which is why it’s absolutely necessary for companies to sit down with the relevant service provider before beginning a project and analyse the target group, the specific needs, and the general conditions involved. This would then yield a recommendation on which format and which technology to use.

What are some important considerations when designing VR and AR experiences? Do you have any specific tips?

Jenny: Well, it goes without saying that it’s important to draw several firm distinctions here. AR is used on a multitude of devices ranging from smartphones and tablets to smartglasses, so the size of the device really matters. One thing that people should always do, however, is to make sure that their applications aren’t too difficult to use regardless of whether they’re using gestures or touch. Controls need to be clear and easy to use, and there’s hardly anything as frustrating as not knowing how to make progress when taking a training course. Another thing worth considering is that voice control and a generous use of audio and audio effects can be very good ideas for both technologies. In fact, even music can be ideal depending on how cinematic the end product should be.

 

Having said all that, there is one nugget of wisdom from “normal” e-learning that remains intact for these two new technologies too: Interactivity maximizes learning. In other words, it’s important to give the person taking the course regular opportunities to explore and try things out and interact with the course contents and the learning environment.

What should we keep in mind when introducing AR/VR – in terms of the target group, for example? Would it be true that the younger and more familiarized with digital tools, the better?

Jenny: I know as many “young people” without an affinity for digital tools as “old people” with that affinity. I think it’s less a question of age than of wanting to do it. However, incorporating a phase for getting used to things and a tutorial at the beginning of a training program is never a bad idea.

 

On top of this, it’s important to remember that HMDs weigh a certain amount and that the duration of the course should usually be shorter than normal due to this.
And finally, it’s absolutely crucial to make sure it’s not just a one-time gimmick to be all cool and cutting edge. If someone really wants to use XR learning, it’s important to make a long-term commitment and consult with a professional to identify the learning scenarios that make sense, the devices that should be used, and the way that implementation and maintenance should work.

In addition to a phase for getting used to things and tutorials, are there any other tips you can offer for improving the willingness of students and trainees to use AR/VR learning applications?

Jenny: I think that’s happening by itself right now, to tell you the truth. The exigencies arising from the coronavirus pandemic have essentially made people much more willing to try out new things. In fact, Google Classrooms with VR are enjoying a surge of popularity right now, and we’re seeing less obvious solutions as well, such as people moving their travel plans to their VR headsets due to the lack of other options. And many others are now going to the museum or theatre with (web) VR applications. Now we’re suddenly doing things that would have been completely unimaginable just a few weeks ago.

 

Now, it’s worth mentioning that what has worked particularly well for me is introducing the new technology in a very relaxed and casual way. Simply bring the VR headset and let the person put it on and try out a couple of simple applications and they just usually realize right away that the technology can be fun and is nothing to be afraid of. And, of course, having an advocate team within the company that knows its stuff and can answer questions can be really helpful when introducing things.

What are some current trends in the field of immersive learning and where are things headed?

Jenny: I think the most solid trend is probably that the coronavirus crisis has resulted in a new push towards joint virtual learning. And both social learning and virtual reality were already on every single trend list before the pandemic started, but now we’re seeing a move towards social virtual learning. I think we’re definitely going to see a bunch of new products hit the market in the next few months.

 

I also think that we’re going to see a greater integration of WebVR snippets into “normal” training courses, as that’s a great way to test the waters with this new trend.

 

 

Thank you very much for the exciting interview, Jenny!

The trends of the education rebellion

E-Learning Punk is an article and talk series for all L&D Pros who want to dare something and believe that digital training has to be colourful and loud.

Contact person

Since 2014 I have been part of the marketing & communication team at imc. My heart beats for creative campaigns, exciting content and digital innovations. My goal is to make digital topics understandable and simple to the point. My passions besides my job are good books and sports.
I am always happy to receive feedback on the series at vanessa.klein@im-c.com.
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Vanessa Klein
Senior Event and Communication Manager
lms hot topics E-Learning Glossar
LMS Hot Topics
Topic: E-learning glossary, part 2

The big e-learning glossary - part 2

Lost in LMS and WBT? The e-learning glossary helps!

Welcome to the second part of the big e-learning glossary! Missed part 1? Check out part 1 here. Let's go on with

 

Part 2: From Learning Nugget to xAPI

L
Learning Nuggets

A learning nugget is a short learning unit or a building block or a mini module in e-learning that usually lasts no longer than five minutes. The term is often used in connection with Micro-Learning.

Learning Management System (LMS)

A learning platform or Learning Management System, (LMS for short) is software used to digitally host, manage and track learning content which is typically assigned by tutors to their learners.

More about Learning Management Systems.

Learning Content Management System (LCMS)

A Learning Content Management System (LCMS) is software that enables the creation, storage and management of reusable learning objects. It also enables web-based learning to be organised and maintained by multiple authors. An LCMS combines the functionality of an LMS and a content management system (CMS).

Learning Record Store (LRS)

A Learning Record Store is connected to an xAPI or Tin Cab and collects, stores and retrieves data and learning activities. An LRS can be integrated into an existing LMS.

M
Micro-Learning

Learning content is divided into small units or building blocks for the user to access as individual elements at any time. This flexible approach is also often termed as 'learning nuggets'.

Mobile Learning (M-Learning)

Mobile Learning refers to training accessed through mobile devices. This makes the learning experience more flexible and more independent in terms of time and location. Mobile Learning modules are typically designed for a smaller screen size, and easy navigation.

More about Mobile Learning.

MOOC

A MOOC (a Massive Open Online Course) is an online course aimed at a large number of participants and is usually free of charge. Pioneers of this format are Stanford University, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and Harvard University.

O
On-the-Job-Training (OJT)

On the Job Training refers to learning that takes place alongside activities at the workplace, and usually under the guidance of a colleague, coach or mentor or also through an EPSS. In colloquial terms, "learning by doing" refers to this type of training.

P
Predictive Analytics

Modern learning management systems contain integrated evaluation mechanisms, so-called learning analytics, in order to map the learning behaviour of employees on the basis of complex data sets. Learning analytics helps training managers to evaluate large amounts of data and use them as a basis for decision-making. For example, learning needs and difficult learning topics, i.e. the "blind spots" of learners, can be identified.

S
SCORM

The abbreviation SCORM stands for "Sharable Content Object Reference Model" which references the digital packaging of eLearning courses. Through this format, SCORM courses can be imported and launched through any SCORM compliant platform. Industry standard LMSs all include SCORM players.

Serious Game, also Adventure Game or Learning Game

Serious games are not exclusively for entertainment purposes, but instead convey knowledge or skills through playful actions. See also: Gamification and Game-based Learning which aim to engage and motivate learners through adventures and competition. A further development of the SCORM standard is xAPI.

More about Serious Games.

Social Learning

Social Learning promotes an interaction between learners through sharing learning experiences. eLearning can include social elements through comment functions, social media postings, instant messages, forums, wikis, video chats, etc. which can typically be integrated with modern LMSs. In addition, virtual communities can be set up to exchange ideas, knowledge and new contributions.

More about Social Learning.

V
Video-based Learning

This type of training is the generic term for learning through videos. Videos can be designed and animated in different ways to contextualise learning, or directed by real people 'characters' who guide learners through a topic, which is also known as 'explainer videos'. Another example of video-based learning is the interactive video.

More about Video-based Learning.

W
Web-based Training (WBT)

Unlike computer-based training, no specific software is required. Instead, the user logs into the respective portal, program or website. This is also known as eLearning.
More about Web-based Story Training.

X
xAPI, also Experience API or Tin Can

xAPI is often seen as a further development of SCORM. In principle, learning content and learning systems (LMS) can exchange information with each other in order to record a wide variety of data and learning activities.

To this end, xAPI has redefined some of the basic practices for tracking learning experiences. The main difference between xAPI and SCORM is the type of learning that each participant can follow.

While SCORM is limited to recording online learning, xAPI can track almost any activity. Here xAPI provides a much more detailed view of learning progress, both online and offline.

Different ways of learning xAPI tracks include reading a web page, attending an event, borrowing a library book, playing a game, blended learning and team-based learning.The xAPI data is stored in a Learning Record Store (LRS).

We hope to shed some light on the subject with this overview. Do you have any questions, additions or suggestions? Then feel free to write to us!

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Contact

I have been working in the Marketing & Communication Team at imc since March 2019.

Communication, creative content and social media are my passion. "KISS - Keep it short and simple" is my credo.

 

To explain complex content in an understandable way and thus make the topic of e-Learning accessible to everyone is an exciting challenge every day.

 

Privately I love to read, play poker and travel a lot.

I am always happy to receive feedback or suggestions.

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Nadine Kreutz
Communication Manager
lms hot topics E-Learning Glossar
LMS Hot Topics
Topic: E-learning glossary, part 1

The big e-learning glossary -
part 1

Lost in LMS and WBT? The e-learning glossary helps!

LMS, SCORM, WBT, EPSS, CBT, SCORM, ITS!? Lost in e-learning abbreviations? Digital learning is teeming with cryptic terms, mostly not self-explanatory technical terms and terms that mean the same thing but are called differently.

In this series we shed some light on the subject and have compiled the most important terms and abbreviations in an e-learning glossary.

Part 1: From Adaptive Learning Systems to Interactive Video

A
Adaptive learning systems, also: Intelligent Tutoring Systems (ITS)

Adaptive learning systems gather data on the learner's activities and uses this to adapt the learning journey to the individuals observed needs. Using algorithms, the system will deliver image based content to visual learners and interactive content to a communicative learner, or advanced content to user showing expertise in the subject area.

Adventure Game, also called Learning Game, see Serious Game
Author System or Authoring System/ Content Authoring Tool

An authoring tool is a development tool for interactive applications with which text, graphics, sound and interactivity can be combined to form a piece of content. Authoring tools can be used to create simple presentations or WBT, or with an advanced tool, a full interactive module. No programming knowledge is required for an authoring system.

More about authoring systems.

B
Bespoke content, also Custom content, check Individual content
Blended Learning

Blended learning uses a combination of online and in person training to deliver a training program. The term often also refers to a blended of instructional methods, pedagogical approaches and technologies.

More about blended learning.

C
Conversational Learning, also: Conversational Interfaces

Conversational learning interfaces utilise the basic concepts of social learning to create an interactive learning experience. The chatbot guides the user through the learning material with a question and answer conversation between user and bot. Emoji's are a key part of conversational learning. Used as a replacement for body language, emoji's provide the learner with the non-verbal ques that are missing from digital training tools.

More about Conversational Learning.

Custom content or bespoke content, check individual content
E
Electronic Performance Support System (EPSS)

An EPSS supports just-in-time learning. In contrast to formal learning, this takes place at the point of need. EPSS is typically deployed to support a piece of software and can either guide a user through a process or act as a JIT tool, on hand to provide support when needed. The user gains independence and confidence by efficiently learning new systems and process without the aid of colleagues.

More about Electronic Performance Support.

Extended Enterprise

An extended enterprise means a company that needs to train, for example, franchisees, external service providers, brokers, etc. Such training, often mandatory, can be tackled strategically and efficiently using an integrated automation process built into an existing LMS.
More about Extended Enterprise and Standard Content.

G
Game-based Learning

The term Game-based Learning refers to the appearance and the visual presentation, for example within a serious game. A learning environment must be created that is attractive for the user, in which he can develop further and in which he can gain positive learning experiences.

More about Game-based Learning.

Gamification

This term refers to player motivation. Gamification elements within a serious game can be scores that are displayed to the learner and allow him to compare himself with other players. Further gamification elements are badges and badges, which are awarded after completed tasks.

I
Intelligent Tutoring Systems, IST, see Adaptive Learning Systems
Individual content

Individual content is developed tailor-made for a customer and can appear in various formats, e.g. as a serious game, web-based training or interactive video.

Interactive Video

Interactive videos are films that allow learners to decide for themselves what they want to see next. The learner is thus not only a passive viewer, but actively determines what he sees and learns.

Could we enlighten you? For more aha-moments check out the second part as well!

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lms hot topics: software training
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Contact

I have been working in the Marketing & Communication Team at imc since March 2019.

Communication, creative content and social media are my passion. "KISS - Keep it short and simple" is my credo.

 

To explain complex content in an understandable way and thus make the topic of e-Learning accessible to everyone is an exciting challenge every day.

 

Privately I love to read, play poker and travel a lot.

I am always happy to receive feedback or suggestions.

Photo of Nadine Kreutz
Nadine Kreutz
Communication Manager
Photo of imc colleagues
Job Slot
Unique people. Random questions.

Career hoppers welcome!

What it really takes to become
a concept designer

“Two thirds of you will at some point work in a job that you currently don’t even know exists.” This statement by his former German studies professor hit the nail on the head for Philipp Schossau. After graduation, he applied for a position as a concept designer with an e-learning provider.

Today, his awesome job title at imc is Instructional Designer. However, that didn’t really change his role. In this interview, he reveals what exactly his job entails, the skills it calls for and why he considers it a privilege.

Photo of PhilippSchossau
PHILIPP SCHOSSAU

Job | Concept/ Instructional Designer
Works in | Essen, Germany
At imc since | 2016
Superpower | flexibility to adapt quickly to new projects
Favourite food | Palak Tofu

JOB AND DAILY BUSINESS
Icon representing Office
Hello Philipp! Thanks for making time! It's safe to say your job title Instructional Designer can be a little confusing. Can you explain what that is all about?

Back when I applied for the role after my German philology and history studies, it was called concept designer. I believe that was a bit more obvious. Really, editor for digital training would be the most helpful job description. In other words, I develop the learning concept for our clients.

How would you explain what you do to your grand parents?

That's not quite as straightforward. There have been a few misunderstandings in my family over the years. I've often been described as someone who writes operating instructions for Volkswagen, or plain and simple "Philipp works in advertising".

Today I say: I create professional development for large companies, just from my PC.

What does your typical day at work look like?

When I'm in the office, I start by checking my emails. Then, I prioritise and schedule the tasks at hand and check the status of my projects. For example, I might be working on a script or coordinate with other teams or the client.

Generally speaking, there's always a good mix of extensive communication and creative work. I like this change between active talk and interaction and the extremely quiet phases, where I'm totally focused and block out everything else.

You stated earlier that you are the person who develops learning concepts for clients.
Can you explain that in a little more detail?

Once a contract has been concluded, a colleague from Sales, the competent project manager and myself typically have an initial meeting with the client. We outline the scope of the project and I double-check what exactly the client wants - or what they think they need.

I need to understand very quickly what expectations they hold and what exactly the employees are ultimately meant to learn. Based on this, I advise the client and we sit down together to define the type of training we want to develop.

The next phase is the concept stage with a rough and detailed concept. Once the detailed concept has been approved, it is handed over to the programmers and designers. Again, I'm involved in the coordination, and I test the Beta version before we submit it to the client.

CHALLENGES AND BENEFITS
What is more difficult in the concept development: If the client has no idea what they want, or if they have very specific expectations?

Neither is easy. Both require immense tact and instinct. When a client has no idea at all and is totally happy with all your suggestions to the point where they can't make a decision, you ultimately need to make the decision for them as a concept designer and hope that it really is a good fit. Meanwhile, it might not be possible to realise that very clear vision some clients have, or to align it with the actual training goals.

I often have to educate my clients, as many cannot judge the time and cost investments involved - for example, for some animations. Some expect teasers in blockbuster quality for next to nothing within a week. Of course, that's unrealistic. It takes a good bit of diplomacy and explanation.

 

Now, I would say, the most crucial aspect is found elsewhere: It's really important to start by defining and clarifying all the terms. Say, gamification: everyone has a different understanding of what that means. I need to get people on board from where they are. The best way to achieve that is to use specific examples and results from our portfolio. Overall, client consultation can sometimes be a balancing act.

I need to decide what to advise the client on, when to talk them out of an unrealistic idea, and when to respect their wishes. Thankfully, I have learned a lot in my nine years on the job.

What do you appreciate the most about your job?

Without a doubt, the variety. I deal with such an extensive range of people, industries and topics, and really like the project business. Maybe it sounds a bit cheesy, but I work in a job where I learn something every day. I consider that a great privilege.

PERSONAL LIFE
What did you want to be as a kid and why?

I think I wanted to become a diver at some point. I really don't know why though. I guess it looked pretty cool with the wetsuits and such...

How important is professional development to you personally? What do you do in that regard?

In the project business, personal development can be difficult. Of course, there's the big professional development (CPD) courses - I qualified as a certified face-to-face trainer last year.

Mostly though, I do many micro courses. I always keep an eye on what others in my field are doing, and try to learn from that to develop myself.

What your favourite way to start your day?

I just love being woken up by my kids!

Thank you very much and I hope you'll keep having diverse interesting projects!

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IMC CAREER

Would you like to know more about imc as an employer? Then take a look at our career section, maybe there is a suitable position for you.

We are also always happy to receive unsolicited applications!

imc Job Slot: Unique people. Random questions.

Random questions, regularly new faces and jobs – that's the job slot of imc.

Contact

I have been working in the imc Marketing & Communication team since March 2019.

 

I am passionate about communication, creative content and social media. I live by the motto: “KISS – Keep it short and simple!”

Explaining complex content in simple terms and making e-learning accessible to everyone are challenges that make every day exciting.

 

In my time off, I like to read, play poker and travel a lot. 

I am always happy to receive feedback or suggestions: nadine.kreutz@im-c.de.

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Nadine Kreutz
Communication Manager
E-Learning Punk: Man in a Suit with a Questionmark representing his head E-Learning Trends
E-Learning Punk

The quiz show phenomenon in e-learning

Understanding why companies should rely on quiz apps in professional development

Learning by quizzing: are you always looking for entertaining fun facts for your next small talk? We feel the same way. That's why today's E-Learning Punk article starts with a quick question for all the British Royal family fans.

 

The Queen…

  • A: celebrates her birthday twice a year
  • B: has already had a little plastic surgery
  • C: swears by yoga in the morning

You will get the answer at the end of the article. First of all we want to look at where the interest in quizzes comes from, how companies can make use of them in training and what needs to be considered.

The success of quizzes depends on the mix

Jeopardy and QuizUp are just two well-known quiz examples. Quizzing is simply fun, it activates the reward centre in our brain and provides flow experiences with the right questions. Companies can also take advantage of this and use quiz apps in professional development. The quiz apps combine the advantages of mobile learning and game-based learning.

 

Various game elements are used, which in combination contribute to the success of the format. Here are the three most important elements of quiz apps:

Icon representing Avatar Quiz apps

Avatars

They are used as identification figures. Wonderwomen, Jack Sparrow or Count Dracula - my avatar allows me to present my innermost self or to slip into different roles.

Icon representing competition Quiz apps

Competition

By competing against other players, my ambition is aroused (fun fact: this is especially true for men, women are usually more reserved). When I play in a group, I feel like I'm part of something bigger. This phenomenon is also described as "epic meaning".

Icon representing Feedback Quiz apps

Feedback

If I answer a question correctly, there will be points and I will be promoted to the high score list. If I answer a question incorrectly, there are no points. It's that simple. The feedback is clear, honest and direct.

LEARNING BY QUIZZING

Quiz apps as a learning tool?

With BizQuiz, IMC also has a quiz app that uses the three elements just described. We evaluated the data of about 100,000 players and came to the result that quiz apps in continuing education are a learning trend that - when used correctly - leads to really amazing success:

INFO

Most players play daily - even on weekends. As a result, after just three weeks they know about 1.5 times more than at the beginning.

That makes sense. People are learning by repetition. By repeating something over and over again, it becomes an unconscious competence for me and takes place automatically at some point - like typing with ten fingers or flashing while driving. "We only see limitations when a target group simply has too little basic knowledge for the topic," says Oliver Nussbaum, IMC Managing Director in Austria and quiz master. But here we also have to say, the right mix makes the difference.

USE CASES

Areas of application for quiz apps in companies

Experts use quiz apps at various points of the learning journey and combine the quizzes with other tools such as digital learning cards and classroom training. Sounds complex? Want to know more? Ok, here we go. Quizzes are ideal whenever the level of knowledge needs to be tested or knowledge needs to be consolidated:

Icon representing Knowledge testing Quiz apps

Testing the state of knowledge

At the first point of the learning journey, quizzes helps to determine the status of the learners and to discover knowledge gaps. Ideally, the learning content is tailored to the results.

Icon representing Knowledge approval Quiz apps

Consolidate knowledge

After face-to-face training or e-learning, quizzes can make a significant contribution to consolidating knowledge. Perfectly suited are quizzes that run over a period of two to three weeks and reward with a real prize at the end.

TIPS & TRICKS
5

tips for the use of quiz apps in continuing education

So now we know what elements make quiz apps so successful and at what point in the learning journey quizzing can provide a bit of fun and motivation. Finally, we have a few tips for you to make sure that the quizzes don't miss their effect and you don't get bored:

  1. Limite the maximum number of games that can be played per day.
  2. Do not use quizzes in an inflationary way. Instead, use them mainly for topics of strategic importance and with a manageable number of questions.
  3. Pay attention to the flow channel when creating questions. A good question should not be too difficult, but also not too easy.
  4. Provide small incentives that have a positive effect on the status of the winner, for example an exclusive meeting with the management board.
  5. Leave the game as what it is: a game. Not a formal learning measure. Don't force your learners to participate.

 

The right answer is A, by the way.

The trends of the education rebellion

E-Learning Punk is an article and talk series for all L&D Pros who want to dare something and believe that digital training has to be colourful and loud.

Contact person

Since 2014 I have been part of the marketing & communication team at imc. My heart beats for creative campaigns, exciting content and digital innovations. My goal is to make digital topics understandable and simple to the point. My passions besides my job are good books and sports.
I am always happy to receive feedback on the series at vanessa.klein@im-c.com.
Photo of Vanessa Klein
Vanessa Klein
Senior Event and Communication Manager
E-Learning Punk Talk Roman Rackwitz Gamification game-based learning
E-Learning Punk

Punky Talk #2: Roman Rackwitz

Gamification guru Roman Rackwitz wants to break down barriers

The second Punky Talk focuses on game-based learning, quiz-based learning and AI . We are hosting Roman Rackwitz, gamification guru and CEO of Engaginglab GmbH.

 

Roman has been involved in game thinking and gamification since 2007. He has already been named one of the top 10 gamification experts in the world. He describes himself as a naive optimist who rebels against the mindset that gaming were a waste of time. He wants to break down barriers and make games a natural thing, even in a corporate environment.

 

In the interview with E-Learning Punk moderator Vanessa, he talks about why failure is so important for our personal progress, why content is king but context is god, and why rewards should act as feedback – not bribery.

 

The interview was recorded live at LEARNTEC 2020 in Karlsruhe (Germany).

 

Enjoy watching!

 

 

(Note: under "settings", you can turn on the English subtitles for this interview)

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The trends of the education rebellion

E-Learning Punk is an article and talk series for all L&D Pros who want to dare something and believe that digital training has to be colourful and loud.

Contact person

Since 2014 I have been part of the marketing and communication team at imc. My heart beats for creative campaigns, exciting content and digital innovations. My goal is to make digital topics understandable and simple to the point. My passions besides my job are good books and sports.
I am always happy to receive feedback on the series at vanessa.klein@im-c.com.
Photo of Vanessa Klein
Vanessa Klein
Senior Event and Communication Manager
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Punky Talk #1: Karlheinz Pape

The founder of a popular German learning community talks to us about self-directed learning

In our E-Learning Punk series, we publish a new article on current digital training trends each month. The last three months have been dedicated to the following three trends: video-based learning, blended learning and mobile learning. Now, in the first Punky Talk, E-Learning Punk editor Vanessa talks to Karlheinz Pape, founder of the German Corporate Learning Community (CLC), about these topics, but also about his favourite, self-directed learning.

 

With the CLC, Karlheinz has established a community network that drives new forms of learning. In our interview, Karlheinz appeals to the crowd to reject their prejudices against learning with video. He also explains why Twitter is his number one learning booster and why mobile learning is an artificial term for him.

 

Listen for yourself below.

(Note: under "settings", you can turn on the English subtitles for this interview)

The trends of the education rebellion

E-Learning Punk is an article and talk series for all L&D Pros who want to dare something and believe that digital training has to be colourful and loud.

Contact person

Since 2014 I have been part of the marketing and communication team at imc. My heart beats for creative campaigns, exciting content and digital innovations. My goal is to make digital topics understandable and simple to the point. My passions besides my job are good books and sports.
I am always happy to receive feedback on the series at vanessa.klein@im-c.com.
Photo of Vanessa Klein
Vanessa Klein
Senior Event and Communication Manager
E-Learning Punk Talk E-Learning Trends blended learning
E-Learning Punk

Punky Talk #3: Katharina Kunz

The learning strategy expert demands: “Arrange your learning offer as a buffet!”

The third Punky Talk is all about blended learning. We welcome our guest Katharina Kunz. As a learning strategy expert, Katharina Kunz helps companies link learning content, systems and people to create a working learning ecosystem. She is appealing to all learning and development managers not to limit professional development to invitations for 4-course meals, but also offer a 24/7 learning buffet.

 

In our E-Learning Punk interview, Malte had already compared a successful blended learning solution to a balanced meal. Katharina picks up the thread right there and takes it one step further. She explains why we should look at the bigger picture of blended learning – the entire learning offer, rather than just one topic – and why a buffet offers greater flexibility, enabling us to create customised learning experiences on demand.

 

Enjoy watching!

(Note: under "settings", you can turn on the English subtitles for this interview)

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Roman Rackwitz hhas already been named one of the top 10 gamification experts in the world. In the E-Learning Punky Talk, he discusses game-based learning, quiz-based learning and AI.

The trends of the education rebellion

E-Learning Punk is an article and talk series for all L&D Pros who want to dare something and believe that digital training has to be colourful and loud.

Contact person

Since 2014 I have been part of the marketing & communication team at imc. My heart beats for creative campaigns, exciting content and digital innovations. My goal is to make digital topics understandable and simple to the point. My passions besides my job are good books and sports.

 

I am always happy to receive feedback on the series at vanessa.klein@im-c.com.

Photo of Vanessa Klein
Vanessa Klein
Senior Event and Communication Manager
E-Learning Punk Video Based Learning E-Learning Trends
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Watch out: Video-based Learning

When e-Learning meets TedTalk and learners become YouTubers

Saturday afternoon: I’m feeling like Houdini after learning a few quick magic tricks from YouTube, my nephew Tom’s birthday party is saved, plus I can use the money I’ve saved to take Tom out next week. Sunday morning: Tom’s relaxing after his party and, like every Sunday, watching an episode of Art Attack on the Disney Channel. This week he’s drawing dogs.

 

What do Tom and I have in common? We both learned something thanks to videos at the weekend!

 

What works so well in our free time is now becoming more and more popular in organisations. Although YouTube and how-to series have been around for a while for anything from boiling an egg to installing a dishwasher, video-based learning is the new black in continuing education. Or as Josh Bersin says: „Video is the next text.

So what’s the big deal?

YouTube has more than one billion users - almost a third of all Internet users (YouTube). Sir Ken Robinson's TedTalk on „Do schools kill creativity“ has over 58 million views. The number of videos and the access to videos on the world wide web is increasing, and with it the number of hobby filmmakers. This is not least due to the fact that the smartphone possibilities are getting better and better when it comes to video. So you can say:

INFO

Videos are easy to create & easy to consume.

This is a trend that companies are now following so they can benefit from the advantages of visual learning - but also because videos simply fit in so well with the continuing education trends "mobile learning" and "microlearning".

WATCH OUT

Still not convinced on e-Learning videos?

Notebook with a video play button video based learning video based learning

Humans are visual beings. In the Stone Age we learned to pay attention to movements and thus to recognise enemies and dangers early on. Even today, moving images attract our attention. Videos also help us to understand and process information more quickly - more precisely, 60,000 times faster than text messages. And finally, learning is information processing.

 

The memory masters show the way: If they want to remember long chains of numbers, they usually link these verbal messages with visual images in their mind. This activates different brain areas to increase memory recall and ultimately better learning results.

FORMATS
5

more reasons why you need videos in your content library

Icon representing Screenrecording video based learning

Screen-Recordings

They’re especially well-suited for short software how-to´s. In addition, the recordings can easily be created by learners themselves. Keyword: user-generated content.

Explainer videos

Simple drawings or animations in comic style can explain complex and technical topics clear and concise way and get to the heart of the matter.

Icon representing Interactive video based learning

Interactive videos

Because learners have to react to the content and thus influence the further course of the story, passivity is prevented even with longer content and engagement increases.

Icon representing Storybased Learning video based learning

Story-based videos

Using real people in real situations increases identification with the learning content.

Icon representing 360° video based learning

360° videos

Rotatable 3D or 360° views make it possible to explore a new product or even an unknown place to the deepest corners.

TIPS & TRICKS

Now you know the why and what, get started on the how tips for creating video trainings

Finally, for those who would like to bring a little Hollywood glamour into their training, here are a few tips for creating learning videos:

 

  • keep it simple, stupid (KISS). Keep your learners on their toes with short, sharp videos
  • don't lose sight of your objectives and target group
  • combine visual and auditory stimuli for maximum learning success
  • but: don’t forget subtitles, most videos are played mobile without sound
  • give your learners control over content selection with meaningful titles and playlis

 

We hope you will conquer the hearts and minds of your learners with our tips. The next issue of eLearning Punk next month will be dedicated to "Blended Learning".

The trends of the education rebellion

E-Learning Punk is an article and talk series for all L&D Pros who want to dare something and believe that digital training has to be colourful and loud.

Contact person

Since 2014 I have been part of the marketing team at IMC. My heart beats for creative campaigns, exciting content and digital innovations. My goal is to make digital topics understandable and simple to the point. My passions besides my job are good books and sports.
I am always happy to receive feedback on the series at vanessa.klein@im-c.com.
Photo of Vanessa Klein
Vanessa Klein
Senior Event and Communication Manager
E-Learning Punk Mobile Learning E-Learning Trends
E-Learning Punk

Mobile Learning Life-Hacks

How to create engaging content that your team can consume from anywhere

There are over three million smartphone users worldwide, 700 million app downloads per day, an average of 80 apps installed on each mobile phone, nine of which are used daily (Techjury.net) – the figures speak for themselves.

OUR FUTURE IS MOBILE

So if our future is mobile, shouldn't it also be the way we learn?

What are your excuses for not using mobile learning?

It is perfectly tailored to the target current generation who have grown up with access to the internet, smartphones, twitter and competition for their attention. Mobile solutions make it possible for information to be available - anytime, anywhere and in real time. News services, marketing and newspaper publishers around the world have long since realised this and those responsible for education and training in companies can no longer close their eyes to the trend.

DON´TS
4

common approaches should take when designing mobile learning

  1. Use Responsive Design technologies: Whether Smartphone, Tablet or Desktop - Responsive Design means that the arrangement and presentation of the content automatically adapts to the users device ensuring a pleasant user experience. This gives learners flexibility by enabling multi-device learning and purposes the content to their chosen device.
  2. Think "mobile first": Although mobile screen size has increased, what hat works well on a large desktop/laptop screen will not automatically translate to mobile. Content planning and mobile user design must be factored at the early stage and plans adjusted accordingly.
  3. Be concise and to the point: Mobile learning should ideally be short and crisp with a focus "microlearning" units that trigger a sense of accomplishment and can be accessed at any point, such as on public transport, over coffee or on the couch.
  4. Consider the security requirements: In addition to the content, you should consider your organisationsIT and security policies. Ideally your IT department and LMS Systems Administrator should be consulted in mobile learning projects to ensure that all content can be accessed easily and securely on the move.
DO´S
4

mobile learning formats that work particularly well on the move

Nachdem wir nun also wissen, was wir besser nicht tun sollten, kommen nun vier Formate, die für Mobile Learning wie geschaffen sind:

Videos

With radical improvements in global internet speeds, short videos are ideal for on-the-go learning. Please also read our article on video-based learning.

Icon representing Performance cards mobile learning

Performance Cards

Digital quick reference guides are perfect for providing t the most important information at a glance when needed - for example, to give sales staff key selling points for sales pitch to a customer.

Mini quizzes

Short, playful knowledge queries help anchor information in long-term memory. If the quizzes are combined with gamification elements such as scoring, badges and leaderboards they will bring out the human nature of competition.

Conversational Learning

Here, content is presented as chat conversation - in simple language, with emojis for emotional address and reinforcement of statements. This replicates the social elements of using our phones and presents learning in a more natural way.

The trends of the education rebellion

E-Learning Punk is an article and talk series for all L&D Pros who want to dare something and believe that digital training has to be colourful and loud.

Contact person

Since 2014 I have been part of the marketing & communication team at imc. My heart beats for creative campaigns, exciting content and digital innovations. My goal is to make digital topics understandable and simple to the point. My passions besides my job are good books and sports.
I am always happy to receive feedback on the series at vanessa.klein@im-c.com.
Photo of Vanessa Klein
Vanessa Klein
Senior Event and Communication Manager