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A Fine Line Between Genius and Madness: A Day in the Life of an IT- System Administrator

A Fine Line Between Genius and Madness: A Day in the Life of an IT- System Administrator

Q: What do you get if you combine technical savvy with the patience of a saint and a willingness to help? A: The perfect system administrator. In other words, someone like Raffael Willems, Head of Internal IT at imc. Not that life in IT is always perfect...

You have to be slightly mad to want to do this job. Apparently, there’s quite a bit more to solving problems in internal IT than just saying “have you tried turning it off and back on again?”

 

Raffael Willems has been Head of Internal IT here at imc for about a year. In this interview, he tells us about his average working day, and why his job requires not just basic curiosity, but patience, good communication skills, and empathy as well.

Raffael Willems, imc

Raffael Willems

Job | Head of Internal IT

Working in | Saarbruecken, Germany

Worked at imc since | 2021

Super power | Patience & willingness to help

Favourite food | Pretty much everything - but good!

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Hi Raffael, thanks for making time to talk to us! You’re the boss of internal IT here at imc. How would you explain to your three-year-old daughter what you do for a living?

Funnily enough, my daughter actually likes to “help” me with my work. When I’m working from home, she loves to type along with me on one of my numerous keyboards. She knows my job has something to do with computers and helping people. The way I explain it to her is that I’m in charge of everything that flashes, goes “beep”, causes trouble, and hinders people in their work.

So, your role as a system administrator is to ensure everyone at imc can do their work?

Pretty much. My job is to make sure everyone else is able to do their job. I’m the one people call when some technical problem or other is causing them grief.

What does that look like on a day-to-day basis? Do you just sit there, waiting for people to call with their problems?

No, no, of course not. While I’m having my first coffee of the morning, I read my emails and Teams messages, look at the ticket system, and check using our monitoring system whether everything’s ok, or whether there’s something needing attention urgently. Then I work through my to-do list for the day – which is not all short-term tasks, by the way.

 

I also have a lot of longer-term projects on the go that require a fair amount of planning. Planning is important because the kinds of changes I initiate affect everyone. If I mess something up, that could very well put 350 people out of action. That’s why good planning and communication with a range of departments are absolutely essential.

What do you like most about your job?

This may sound a little counter-intuitive, but what I like most of all is the creativity. As I said, my job is to try to find solutions that work for everyone, but I also have to make sure they comply with our stringent security and data protection policies. That can often be challenging to reconcile. But certain things, like hardware equipment and security updates, just have to be managed top-down to ensure they’re done properly.

 

I really enjoy working with other people, and the more different they are, the more exciting I find it. I mean, a call from a developer is a very different experience to a call from Marketing. Different people speak completely different languages – figuratively as well as literally. And then there are the many different nationalities and cultures here at imc. That’s quite a change from where I used to work, and I really enjoy it.

 

One thing I particularly appreciate about my work here is that my ideas always fall on fertile ground. There are no wrong answers, and new ideas get listened to and not dismissed out of hand. You can always bounce ideas around and try to come up with creative solutions that work for the greatest number of people.

What personal qualities do you need to be a IT-System Administrator?

Above all else, patience. As an IT- System Admin, you’re constantly dealing with people – communicating and explaining things and, every so often, smoothing ruffled feathers. You have to realize that most people, whatever the company, see IT projects and processes as a necessary evil. People just want things to work properly so they can get on with their job. And that’s totally legitimate, but technology is changing so rapidly that IT is constantly having to adapt.

 

Even so, you can’t just throw a new system at people and expect them to welcome it with open arms and work with it, no questions asked. You have to get the affected departments onboard early on, involve them, be patient, and understand what they need and how they work. Just because a system is a huge hit with Sales doesn’t mean it’s assured of rave reviews in Content, and vice versa.

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Hence, as well as patience and good communication skills, you also need empathy. I have to put myself in the other person’s shoes so that I can understand what the problem is and how I can support them. And if things do start getting heated, I need to get alongside those concerned and calm them down.

In day-to-day terms, that means you need to be able to read between the lines. If I can tell from the tone of the e-mail that the writer is extremely annoyed, then I can reach out directly and try to calm things down so that the situation doesn’t escalate. That requires experience and well-honed instincts.

 

Another key personal quality for being a sys admin is the ability to get to grips rapidly with new subject areas. Sometimes there are situations that require fast decisions, so you need to be able to compile and evaluate the relevant information very quickly. I may have no prior knowledge of the problem someone is writing to me about, but I still have to respond quickly with a valid answer. Hence you always need to be keen to learn new things, especially in IT, where rapid technological change is a given.

On a scale of one to ten, how well would you say your training prepared you for your current role?

I’d say seven. During my training as an IT System Electronics Engineer, I was fortunate to have a trainer who always believed in me. He would always say that in my chosen career I was walking a fine line between genius and madness. But he made sure to teach me the things that really matter – and not just the hard skills, but the soft skills as well.

Thanks to him, I developed a certain sense of ambition and learned to stick with things, to complete my tasks reliably and to not be afraid to step into conflict situations where necessary, but without losing my calm. So, a big shout out to Volker Laufer!

What attracted you to the profession of System Administrator. How did you get into it?

My father was a primary school teacher, and he got me interested in computers at a very young age. Back in the 1980s, he wrote his own learning software for Atari and Commodore. And for my mother, who was a self-employed music teacher, he wrote a sheet music learning program in Omicron Basic. Of course, I was always looking over my dad’s shoulder, and when I got my first Windows PC, I learned a lot just by experimenting and trying things out. So, when I got older, I naturally gravitated towards a career involving computers.

 

The fact that I am now working for an e-learning provider is a source of great pride for my parents, because in a sense I’ve brought the family full-circle. I feel the same way, which is why I’m able to identify very closely with imc’s values and products. It’s like I’m getting back to my roots.

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In what ways does imc differ from most of your previous employers?

Well, there’s the company’s size, of course, but mainly it’s the communication culture. Here, whenever I introduce something new, it takes two weeks tops for everyone to get on board with it, including everyone over in Australia. At my last employer, it would take an eternity, even though they don’t have any locations outside Germany. Here, people talk to each other, share ideas, and read the updates that I post in the blog.

 

But the biggest difference is the mindset. At imc, the attitude to change is more positive than negative. I never have to explain to anyone that IT changes and that they can’t keep doing things the same way they’ve been doing them for the last 15 years. Perhaps that’s due to the greater diversity here, and to the average employee age, which I think is about 38.

The people here also have a relaxed way of dealing with each other – there’s no stuffy business etiquette, just a willingness to help one another. And if you’re going through a tough time personally, that’s ok too. You can talk about it and get support.

Here’s a recent example that says a lot about our culture around mistakes and how we get along with one another. I was working on something that I failed to think through properly, and, as you’d expect, when the admin screws up, it affects the whole company. It wasn’t anything major, but it was still annoying. Pretty soon, one of my colleagues stormed into my office in a rage and had a complete meltdown over it. But that evening, we spoke about it again over a beer or two, and it was fine.

 

Mistakes happen, and people here accept that. Nobody holds that mistake against me, because they all know it wasn’t malicious and because I admitted it immediately and apologised. Plus, they know me as someone who does a good job and is always willing to help.

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You’ve been with us for almost exactly a year now. What’s your reflection on how things have gone?

It might only have been one year, but it feels like ten – and in a really good way! I feel like I’ve been here forever because I’ve already gotten to know so many people and worked on so many projects and systems – I guess what I’m saying is, I feel needed. There is still a lot to do, obviously, and the processes are not quite the way I would like them to be, but we’re getting there.

 

Here at imc, my work is valued, people take the time to thank me, and I feel there’s a very healthy culture around conflict and mistakes. Discussions here are based on reasoned arguments. Rather than rejecting new ideas as a matter of course, the people here embrace change and accept that change also means new technology. That’s because change isn’t just about how you work; it’s also about how your workplace is equipped and what the systems are behind it.

What would you like to change?

I think we could do more to raise imc’s profile as an employer. For example, when I first applied, I knew virtually nothing about the company. Having said that, I was really impressed with the overall application process.

I also really liked the Welcome Days organized by the HR department and the way I was onboarded and welcomed into the fold. I would like to see imc build on this positive applicant experience and inspire more people to join the company – and hence also join my team.

 

 

I’m sure we can manage that. Thank you for sharing these valuable insights. You clearly love your job. Long may that continue!

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I have been working in the Marketing & Communication Team at imc since March 2019.

Communication, creating unique content and social media are my passion.

 

"One can not not communicate" - Paul Watzlawik.

To explain complex content in an understandable way and thus make the topic of e-Learning accessible to everyone is an exciting challenge every day.

 

Privately I love to read, play poker and travel a lot.

I am always happy to receive feedback or suggestions.

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Nadine Kreutz
Communication Manager
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The rise of Mr. Hilarious – From a small garage start-up to Managing Director at imc Austria

The rise of Mr. Hilarious – From a small garage start-up to Managing Director at imc

No. We’re not talking a Hollywood script for a new Vince Vaughn comedy. We’re telling the story of a Managing Director at imc. He reveals his most important task, and what work-life balance means to him today.

“Full of shenanigans” – that’s a beautiful phrase, right? It’s the first thing that came to mind when I first spoke to Oliver Nussbaum. It sums him up perfectly, as if the phrase was coined especially for him. You will soon understand why.

 

Olli is a Managing Director of imc Austria. In the late 1990s, he started an e-learning company – while dropping out of university and long before anyone had even heard of e-learning. When imc AG bought his company in 2008, he was kept on the payroll. In 2012, he became Managing Director of imc Austria, a role he now shares with his colleague Marc Müller.

 

In this interview, he shares how his understanding of work-life balance and career success has changed over the years, what he considers his most important task, and what really drives him up the wall.

Oliver Nussbaum, imc

Oliver Nussbaum

Job | Managing Director imc Austria

Working in | Graz, Austria

Worked at imc since | 2008

Super power | Enthusiasm

Favourite food | Piccata Milanese

Job Slot office life, seperator

Hello Olli! Thank you for taking the time. What exactly does Managing Director mean? Can you explain your role in one sentence?

One sentence? OK: I know a little bit of everything, but nothing in-depth.

Respect! That was short and sharp. Can you explain it a bit further?

My job is to ensure that things run smoothly. Essentially, it is my responsibility to create a working environment for our employees that provides them with everything they need while also making them satisfied and keen to come to work. I clear their path as much as possible and remove obstacles so they can focus on their actual job. People want jobs that meet these four criteria: a great work atmosphere, interesting tasks, flexible working hours and adequate remunerations.

 

In recent years, priorities have shifted, and money has become less important. Of course, pay has to be fair. Yet, few will stay in a job if it falls short on the other factors – if the work atmosphere is poor, the employer is inflexible, or tasks are repetitive and boring.

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Let’s talk flexibility. In 2022, imc introduced a flexible working time model under the motto: “100% flexible but not 100% remote.” How are you realising that in Austria?

Here in Austria, our team comprises 27 members. Most of us come to the office at least once or twice a week. We hold all our important team meetings on a Monday, and we all come in that day. The other four days are flexible. Some come in almost every day, others really only do on a Monday.

 

We were absolutely certain that we wanted to remain flexible after corona – especially when we saw that productivity shot up by almost 30% when we were forced to work from home! I keep a close eye on working hours to avoid overtime, and I strive to keep fluctuation close to zero. What you need to consider is that after 5, 10 or even 15 years with the company, the wealth of knowledge a team member accumulates is so profound that it becomes almost impossible to replace them.

This is why it is so important for me to create employee satisfaction, so that both our new and our long-time employees say: I love working here!

Sounds like a very relaxed approach. Many a traditionalist might even accuse you of not actually working.

Well, no. One glance at our output puts paid to that suggestion. Of course, I do place a lot of trust in my employees, and I put them first – as a person. However, I can only offer that flexibility if our corporate objectives are met. I expect absolute honesty, team spirit and a willingness to take responsibility. We are a team and think as a team. If one link in this chain becomes a burden on others, I will remove it sooner rather than later.

A person who compromises the collective effort, refuses to take responsibility for their work or offloads their tasks onto others will not have a future with us. I communicate this very clearly from day one to ensure everyone knows the script.

What exactly do you mean by honesty?

Honesty really is something I deeply care about. I am always totally honest to myself and others. The opinions I hold are not always that popular. Some will dislike that. However, I also don’t have an issue with others giving it to me straight. As a Managing Director, I need to be able to handle that. It is part of my job, and I would rather people let their frustration out on me than on my team. Our hierarchies are very flat. We don’t just preach an open-door policy because it’s cool. Everyone knows that they can come to me with any issue whatsoever. And they do.

 

To get back to your question: Honesty already starts during recruitment. I communicate our flat hierarchies very clearly from the outset. The last thing I would want is new team members getting the wrong idea about promotion opportunities and the like. Our structure naturally limits traditional progression through the ranks. Where we are not limited is in constantly offering new and exciting client projects and novel products like the imc Express authoring tool we developed in Austria.

 

Now, I also expect openness and honesty towards and from our clients, and I expect dealings to be on an equal footing. I cannot promise or sell anything our clients don’t need. It really is that simple.

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Let’s talk about you and your career. How did you train for this role? What was your career path?

After finishing high school, I went to university to study business management. But I successfully dropped out after a few years. Nonetheless, that time was very valuable to me. For instance, during my semester abroad in Colorado, USA, I studied computer design. This was in the mid-1990s. Back then, you could hardly even find a PC in Europe.

 

I learned a lot about graphic design and got into intermediate and small film production. That sparked the idea to create my own learning videos. Thus, I got together with my former partner to start an e-learning company. The thing is, in the German-speaking region, nobody really knew what e-learning was supposed to be, and nobody understood what we were trying to do.

That was a really exciting time. It was huge fun. We had a proper garage start-up. We hired a room right above the employee shop of a Siemens branch. So, you could walk into the building and buy a washing machine with your computer-based training.

 

As the company grew, I took on different responsibilities. I handled sales, for example. At some point, my studies got in the way, so I dropped them to give all my focus to the company. We grew to 25 employees across the DACH region, Germany, Austria, and Switzerland, that is, before selling the company to imc in 2008. That was a massive change for me personally. All of a sudden, I went from being an entrepreneur to an employee. That said, I think more like an entrepreneur now than I ever did before!

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What characteristics do you think a Managing Director needs to bring to the table?

Above all, you need great social skills and empathy, and be a good judge of character. You also need to know what really matters. You cannot waste time with micromanagement. You need to delegate. A good Managing Director must be able to hire people who can do things better than them – without any hint of fear. I consider that a key competence.

 

On the other hand, you also need to have experience in the business and the environment. You also need to be open-minded, draw on a broad knowledgebase, and have at least some understanding of pretty much any issue – enough to enable you to judge how important or urgent these issues are, and how your market and your customers think.

 

In a nutshell, there are three things I consider crucial: First of all, social skills. That includes the ability to hire the right people. Secondly, a healthy approach to delegation. Thirdly, keeping an eye on the big picture without losing focus.

How would you define professional success?

My definition has changed many times over the years. During different stages of my life, professional success meant something different to me. In the beginning, I always wanted more: more customers, more revenue, more employees. I wanted to see the company take the big stage. The sale to imc seemed like a perfect fit for that ambition.

 

Today, I primarily define success by how satisfied my employees and how happy my customers are. I no longer need to be the centre of attention. I’m happy for others to take the credit. For me personally, status symbols and other financial aspects are now taking a backseat. Work-life balance has become a bit of a buzzword, but the “life” part is very important to me. In the past, I lived to work. I have become a lot more relaxed. It has been a few years since I put in a Christmas shift.

 

I also think that success means not taking things personally and developing a certain detachment while preserving your capacity for an emotional response. Taking breaks, trying to see the positives in anything, being able to laugh at things. The Dalai Lama said something along the lines of: “I love it when people laugh, because that is when they have new ideas.” My goal is to spend the rest of my working life in a way that allows me to retire but makes me want to come to work, simply because I enjoy it.

Let’s also talk about negatives. What really gets your hackles up?

I cannot stand deliberate incompetence. We briefly touched on taking responsibility earlier. What really drives me up the wall and – to me – is very much a sign of incompetence is when people deliberately approach something with tunnel vision.

When they refuse to look to the left or right and claim “I wasn’t told to do that” or “It never said that in the requirements specs.” It’s not a healthy mindset. If you are responsible for a project, you really have to take responsibility. You have to make sure that it works. Of course, you can and should consult specialists – but ultimately, you are responsible. Responsibility is not something you can dump on someone else.

 

Another thing I take great issue with is unfounded accusations. I think I made it very clear that anyone can come and tell me what they think. I don’t want them to mince their words, but I do expect these opinions to be plausible and have a basis.

To be quite honest, I also drive people around me nuts. I come late to meeting, I talk too much, I’m not perfect. But let’s carry on.

To round things off – Tell us about a funny experience you had at imc.

There’s been more than a few! This client contacted us with an issue, and we were struggling to really grasp what was going on. So, we asked her to send us a screenshot of the error message. Now, she took a slightly complicated approach: She opened a screenshot image in the editor, took a photograph of that and send us that photo. It showed the wall behind the computer, adorned with an image of a naked man. Of course, we all had a good laugh about that.

Some of the other stories I’d rather tell over a beer and off the record...

 

 

That might be the right thing to do. Thank you very much for this interesting and very entertaining interview, Olli!

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Would you like to know more about imc as an employer? Then take a look at our career section, maybe there is a suitable position for you.

We are also always happy to receive unsolicited applications!

imc Job Slot: Unique people. Random questions.

Random questions, regularly new faces and jobs – that's the job slot of imc.

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Contact person

I have been working in the Marketing & Communication Team at imc since March 2019.

Communication, creating unique content and social media are my passion.

 

"One can not not communicate" - Paul Watzlawik.

To explain complex content in an understandable way and thus make the topic of e-Learning accessible to everyone is an exciting challenge every day.

 

Privately I love to read, play poker and travel a lot.

I am always happy to receive feedback or suggestions.

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Nadine Kreutz
Communication Manager
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A Technical Consultant debunks the myth of the Hermit Techi

Teamwork makes the dream work!

A Technical Consultant debunks the myth of the Hermit Techi

In every company, there are people everyone knows. You always see them around, but cannot help asking: “What exactly do they do?” Of course, the opposite is true of certain other individuals. People who prefer to stay in the background, who are busy backstage – yet everyone knows who they are and just how important they are to keeping things running.

 

That is the sort of person Gajarajan Shanmugalingam aka Gajan is. Gajan has been with imc for eleven years. He is one of the lynchpins in learning management system (LMS) integration. In this interview, he shares what exactly his role as Head of Technical Consulting entails, what skills a technical consultant needs to bring to the table, and why he took his office on the road.

Gajarajan Shanmugalingam

Gajarajan Shanmugalingam

Job | Head of Technical Consulting

Working in | Saarbruecken, Germany

Worked at imc since | 2011

Super power | Analytical thinking

Favourite food | Spaghetti with hot pepper sauce

Job Slot office life, seperator

Hello Gajan! Thank you for taking the time. How would you describe your job as a Technical Consultant to a child?

Hi Nadine, the pleasure’s all mine. Imagine you visit a toy store. The sheer number of choices can be truly overwhelming for a child, or even an adult. My job would be to figure out what you want and what would suit you. I need to understand your requirements and recommend a toy that meets them.

It’s exactly the same with our software. The customer has certain requirements or wants to solve a specific issue. Together with my team, it is my responsibility to determine how we can help them.

That makes sense. But I associate the word consultant with Business Consultancy. How is your role as a Technical Consultant different? Does this involve lots of close collaboration?

At least at imc, Technical Consultants and Business Consultants work together very closely. However, us Technical Consultants tend to join the projects a bit later. The Business Consultants advise our customers on how the imc Learning Suite – our learning management system (LMS) – works, and how they can leverage that. They explain how different processes are mapped, what can be configured and such.

 

We take care of the more profound technical details. We discuss, install and support aspects like database servers, operating systems or single sign-on. We also help to ensure that the LMS rollout runs smoothly for the customer and handle customised adjustments – both in the project phase and during operation. Sometimes, we are roped in at an earlier stage to assist with steps like feasibility studies.

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So, you are always in contact with the customer?

That’s correct. Sometimes even before the actual project kicks off, but definitely throughout the installation phase, and we continue to support them after the system goes live. We either communicate with the customer’s IT team, or directly with the project owner. And internally, we always stay in touch with the Business Consultants, as well as Support, Hosting and even Sales to answer queries related to the offer.

How big is your team? Where are you all based?

In total, 16 people work in Technical Services, split across two teams. I lead one of these teams, and my colleague Patrick Penkala the other one. As Director Technical Services, Andreas Schweitzer supports our Australian and UK colleagues. Rather than all of us being based in Saarbrücken, some of us permanently work from home in various parts of Germany. We are also currently hiring both at our locations and for home office work.

You’re saying it’s OK to work from home?

Absolutely. At imc, we are extremely flexible in general. Nearly all departments allow for a large part of the work being done from home, while keeping the office available. However, we have no desire to completely switch to remote work. Our full team regularly meets in the office, and on those occasions, we also go out for meals together, hold workshops and have longer meetings. Personally, I come in at least once a week. That helps me maintain a personal connection to my team and other colleagues.

 

To be quite honest, I think corona was actually good for our company. I doubt this shift in mindset towards greater flexibility would have been realised this quickly otherwise. It has now become apparent that productivity is not compromised when people work from their home office.

In fact, they even tend to get more work done. That removes any real need to force everyone back into the office or establish fixed office days. Each team can decide for themselves what works best for them.

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What skills, qualifications and training do you need to become a Technical Consultant?

Most of us have a traditional IT degree. But that’s not really a prerequisite. While we do look for appropriate technical understanding, we equally welcome applicants who gained this through an IT-related traineeship or other professional experiences.

The ability to think holistically and analytically is far more important than qualifications: To see the big picture and be creative in finding solutions for the issues at hand. Java is our core programming language. We also use JS frameworks for the frontend and employ various relational databases.

What other skills are important?

Above all, customer centricity. The ability to put yourself into the customer’s shoes, to understand their problems and find solutions. I consider it crucial to be willing to learn, to try and test things, to always seek new understanding, to remain curious.

Now, you are never just left to your own devices – We really are and work as a team. We also made a point of looking out for each other throughout the lockdowns. We are not beyond telling a team member off for working late into the night. We consider ourselves a unit and take responsibility for one another. We can only achieve the best results for our customers if we work as one. And ultimately, that is our goal.

 

To come back to your question: Communication skills are hugely important and must not be underestimated. This might not be as much of an expectation for us techs, but we do work closely with various stakeholders, both internally and externally. If clear communication is lacking, things go wrong.

 

Personally, I really enjoy the fact that there are many sides to this role. If you are motivated and this prospect excites you, you should think about joining our team! We will welcome you with open arms.

imc, teamwork

What does your typical day at work look like?

First of all, I check my emails, sort tickets, and look at the calendar to see which customer enquiries need to be dealt with and what meetings are scheduled. I also look after my team and ensure that everyone’s on the same page.

During corona, I learned that I need to keep work and my private life somewhat separate. So, when I finish work, I actually switch the laptop off, and go for a walk or meet up with friends. I do need to draw a line.

What do you like best about your job? What are you looking forward to each day?

Most of all, I look forward to my team. As I said earlier, we really do have a great relationship. There is no competition, and nobody tries to pass thankless tasks on to other.

I also very much appreciate the opportunity to learn something new every day. It never gets boring, as every customer is different. We usually receive direct feedback from our customers, and knowing they are happy with your work is a great feeling.

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You’ve been working at imc for a while now. Can you recall a particularly funny or odd situation?

As soon as you said that I had to think of my early days with imc. Back then, Andreas Pohl – who is now Director Research and Development – and I visited a major customer. We were meant to do a system migration over the weekend to avoid any disruption to their operations. So far, so good. Everything went smooth and the system go-live was planned for Monday morning.

 

Sunday night, we were already heading back home when the customer ran a final test and a problem occurred that we had not encountered before. I think it was some display that failed to work properly. We had to make a decision.

Where do we go from here? Postpone the go-live? Press ahead with it regardless? As Andreas was driving, I got to work. He told me a few things, and I resolved the software issue while on the road. It worked. The go-live went according to plan and the customer was happy. I will never forget my “very mobile” office, and still have to laugh thinking back on it.

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What did you want to be as a kid?

I never had a specific dream job, but I always knew I wanted to do something with technology. I started programming at a very young age and basically turned my hobby into a career.

You are originally from Sri Lanka. When did you move to Germany?

My family came over when I was twelve and my dad found a job here. It was very tough in the beginning, as I didn’t speak a single word of German and nobody spoke Tamil, my mother tongue. But I learned German pretty quickly, and my parents were very proud when I started my university studies.

Final question: Which imc office are you longing to visit?

Melbourne, of course!

 

 

Of course. Thank you for your time, Gajan, and all the best going forward!

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Hosting is a male domain? Our interview partner Suwhathi proves this wrong! She reveals how she became a Hosting Engineer at imc and what she think about supposed male domains.

Job Slot Andre, Featured image, Connect Four

What Connect Four and Software Architecture Have in Common

What connects Software Architecture and Connect Four? In the latest Job Slot a Software Architect answer these and other questions.

IMC CAREER

Would you like to know more about imc as an employer? Then take a look at our career section, maybe there is a suitable position for you.

We are also always happy to receive unsolicited applications!

imc Job Slot: Unique people. Random questions.

Random questions, regularly new faces and jobs – that's the job slot of imc.

Jobslot Logo

Contact person

I have been working in the Marketing & Communication Team at imc since March 2019.

Communication, creating unique content and social media are my passion.

 

"One can not not communicate" - Paul Watzlawik.

To explain complex content in an understandable way and thus make the topic of e-Learning accessible to everyone is an exciting challenge every day.

 

Privately I love to read, play poker and travel a lot.

I am always happy to receive feedback or suggestions.

Photo of Nadine Kreutz
Nadine Kreutz
Communication Manager
Photo of imc colleagues
Job Slot
Interview with a Software Architect

What Connect Four and Software Architecture Have in Common

I’ve interviewed quite a number of imc colleagues about what exactly their job involves. I’ve put myself in the shoes of software developers, taken a peek behind the scenes in product management, and quizzed colleagues from marketing.

 

But I’ve never encountered anything as complex as what my colleague Eric Andre does for a living. Eric is a software architect, responsible for the imc Learning Management System (LMS). In our interview, he told me what Connect Four and his job have in common, how he trained as a software architect, and what the distinction between happiness and joy has to do with his work.

Eric Andre, Software Architect at imc Learning

Eric Andre

Job | Software Architect

Working in | Saarbruecken, Germany

Worked at imc since | 2021

Super power | Transfering knowledge to new situations

Favourite food | Pizza 

Job Slot office life, seperator

Hi Eric, thanks for making time for us today! I suspect your job description will be pretty meaningless to most laypeople. How would you describe your job to your grandparents?

Hi Nadine, the pleasure’s all mine. I would describe my job to my grandparents simply by saying that my boss gives me a whole lot of brightly coloured Lego bricks which I then put together to make something resembling a house.

Well, that actually sounds pretty simple. Can you explain it a bit further?

To understand what a software architect does, you first need to understand the function of architecture in software. Architecture refers to the fundamental way in which an entire system is organized – the basic framework. It specifies both the individual components that make up the system and the relationships, or dependencies, that exist between them.

 

Hence building a house is an apt metaphor. When you’re planning a house, there are certain things you must specify clearly at the outset. You can leave room for future additions, obviously, but if, for example, you want to be able to add another level at some point, you’ll need to allow for that when planning the foundations.

 

Software is similar in that sense. On the one hand, it must be flexible and open to change rather than static and ossified. But on the other, certain limits and properties must be maintained in the system at all times.

Connect Four is also a good metaphor. Here, architecture is like the blue grid of the game: it provides a structure within which the individual tokens are flexibly arranged and re-arranged. But it only works if the grid is designed to support this.

Job Slot, Connect Four

So, in other words, you have to plan something that doesn’t even exist yet?

Yes, that’s part of it. But I also have to make decisions very early on as to what might be important later on. That’s always a bit like gazing into a crystal ball. But with software architecture, it’s also like a house: if everything is working properly, you don’t give it a second thought. If it’s well planned, there won’t be any problems up front.

 

But planning doesn’t end with the initial build. It’s an ongoing process. It costs time and money, with no immediately obvious benefits. But if you don’t plan, and you just keep on building, then sooner or later things can get really expensive. There’s a great quote from Brian Foote that sums it up beautifully: “If you think good architecture is expensive, try bad architecture!”

Sounds like rather a lot of brainwork. What does your average working day look like?

I usually get up fairly early, sometime between six and seven, and go running for an hour. Then I have a coffee, preferably outside in the garden. That’s when I start thinking about my day. I have a not to-do list, and every day I jot down what I want to achieve and how I intend to go about it. In doing so, I always have our roadmap in the back of my mind.

 

Most mornings, work starts with our team meeting, with me generally pacing back and forth. I prefer to work standing up anyway, and I’m always moving around because I always have a lot to think through, and movement helps me order my thoughts.

 

In the late afternoon, I often go for an hour’s walk or do some gardening, after which I go back to my (standing) desk. My working day ends once I’ve done everything I set out to do that day. This flexibility and the freedom to switch between periods of high intensity and relaxation is very important to me.

So a large part of your work consists of planning. How do you know when a plan is finished and the architecture is ready for implementation? And what happens next?

Good software architecture demands an incredible amount of time and effort. And even then, sometimes you just have to accept that what you’ve come up with won’t work, and that you have to tear it up and start again. Only when I’ve thought everything through in the minutest detail and looked at it again and again from every angle do I know that I have given it enough thought.

 

That’s when the real work begins and I start defining processes and process flows, document requirements, and talk to my team, the developers and other teams. That might sound simple, but believe me, there are a lot of people and departments involved. The Executive Board, too, needs to sign off because the architecture affects the entire system.

imc Job Slot seperator job and career

How does one actually become a software architect?

Not through any classic apprenticeship or any one course of study. There are usually various certificates and modules involved. In most cases, including mine, you end up in this role at some point after starting out in software development. Software developers progress through various stages from junior to senior, at which point career paths branch off in various directions and you’re referred to as an individual contributor.

 

If you want to continue along the hands-on technical career path, you can work your way up to fellow engineer. Alternatively, if you prefer a management role, your career and further development options range from engineering manager all the way up to CTO. Or you can go into software architecture. The journey probably varies from company to company and industry to industry. But ultimately you progress from being a software developer to being an architect who must learn to delegate some of their previous responsibilities as a developer.

These days, there are various kinds of software architect, and each has a different focus. For example, there are enterprise architects, who are responsible for verifying that the organisation’s IT strategy is aligned with its mission. It’s their job to analyse both business properties and the external environment and to define all business needs.

 

Then there are solution architects, whose task is to evaluate all business needs and develop solutions in the form of products or services. They are the interface between business analysts and IT experts.

 

And finally, there are domain – or technical – architects, who mostly work as part of a team and tend to specialize in one particular technology. They can also work as technical project managers. These software architects work collaboratively to ensure the overall system has the flexibility, scalability and security required in order to meet business needs.

Job Slot, directions

And what is your specialism?

I tend to see myself as a solution architect who doubles as a domain architect from time to time. The distinction is somewhat fluid, which is due to our organisational structure. My specialism is in platform architecture. I distribute systems and ensure their interoperability, and I’m passionate about service orchestration and choreography within distributed and reactive service-oriented architectures.

What key skills does your job require?

Adaptability, the ability to transfer and apply knowledge to new areas, and analytical skills. I need to be able to familiarise myself with new subject areas and problems very quickly and transfer my existing knowledge to new situations.

 

For instance, I’m not the best developer by any stretch of the imagination, but I know enough to be able to understand problems and quickly get a handle on the issues involved. Good communication skills are also very important, as I deal with a wide range of stakeholders.

In what respects does imc differ from other employers?

I used to work at a large US corporation, and things were done very differently there in several respects. For example, decision-making processes are much shorter there, and people are more inclined just to give something a try. Here in Germany, there’s generally a lot more discussion and planning before something gets implemented.

 

I’m very happy with the overall situation here at imc. The people here are very open and honest. That came across right from the outset, during my job interview and the onboarding process. But I also like the way people deal with one another. And then there are all those in-house events and knowledge-transfer opportunities.

 

I also really like our approach to design here – it’s all so cohesive. Plus, I like the painstaking attention to detail here, and the fact that people notice when you go the extra mile. It’s not all strait-laced and serious either – people know how to have a bit of a laugh without being puerile. I suppose it’s a little like working for a start-up, albeit one with more structure.

 

Also, in my role, I’m able to work with a very wide range of information and levers, and imc always gives me really good support in that regard.

breaker job slot about me

Now let's go on with some random, personal questions. If you could have your time again, would you still choose to work as a software architect?

Yes, in a heartbeat. I love the challenge – it gives me great joy. And I believe that if you do something that gives you joy, then that’s the key to happiness. If something fills you with joy, you cannot help but be happy.

Please complete the following phrase: For me, digitalisation means...

...that you can’t make a bad analogue process better simply by digitalising it.

What do your colleagues value most about you?

They value my willingness to help and my openness, and also my direct manner. At least, I hope they do!

Do you have any role models, professionally or personally?

Professionally, several. At a personal, human level, the actor Keanu Reeves springs to mind. Despite his immense success, he remains grounded, uses public transport and stands up for others. I find that truly remarkable. Amid all the rapid changes of our modern world, it shows that there are still immutable principles and values that we all share, or at least should share.

 

 

Indeed! And that wraps things up nicely. Thank you for your time, Eric. Here’s wishing you continued joy in your work!

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thumbnail Suwhathi

Living the dream as Hosting Engineer

Hosting is a male domain? Our interview partner Suwhathi proves this wrong! She reveals how she became a Hosting Engineer at imc and what she think about supposed male domains.

Conductors of the Software Orchestra

Conductors of the Software Orchestra: That is how Product Manager Lia from Sibiu explains her job. Find out more in the interview.

IMC CAREER

Would you like to know more about imc as an employer? Then take a look at our career section, maybe there is a suitable position for you.

We are also always happy to receive unsolicited applications!

imc Job Slot: Unique people. Random questions.

Random questions, regularly new faces and jobs – that's the job slot of imc.

Jobslot Logo

Contact person

I have been working in the Marketing & Communication Team at imc since March 2019.

Communication, creating unique content and social media are my passion.

 

"One can not not communicate" - Paul Watzlawik.

To explain complex content in an understandable way and thus make the topic of e-Learning accessible to everyone is an exciting challenge every day.

 

Privately I love to read, play poker and travel a lot.

I am always happy to receive feedback or suggestions.

Photo of Nadine Kreutz
Nadine Kreutz
Communication Manager
Photo of imc colleagues
Job Slot
Interview with an International HR Manager who moved to Germany

From London to Saarbrücken or: How Bridget Jones met James Bond

An International HR Manager who moved from London to Germany shares some insights

Many people living in smaller cities dream of living in metropolitans like London and move there. Claire Raistrick did it the other way around: She grew up near London and worked there as a Human Resources (HR) Manager. But six years ago, she met her personal German “James Bond” and decided on moving to a tiny town in Germany. And as luck would have it, the very same time imc searched for a native English speaker for the international HR Business in Saarbrucken. Another match!

 

In the Job Slot interview Claire reveals more about her career path, why she was shocked in a German supermarket and clears up some prejudices about HR.

Claire Raistrick

Claire Raistrick

Job | International HR Manager

Working in | Saarbruecken, Germany

Worked at imc since | 2020

Super power | Ability to Listen

Favourite food | Typical British Sunday Roast Beef, Yorkshire Puddings and Roast Potatoes 

imc Job Slot seperator job and career

Hi Claire, thanks for joining! First tell us, what exactly do you do in the Human Resources Department?

HR is wide ranging, and no two days are ever the same. It’s not only about hiring and firing or talking to people all day, but HR is also strategic, and there is more to this job than many people realise. I would say you can split HR into the following areas: recruitment and selection (or talent acquisition to give it is new name), performance management, learning and development, pay and reward, human resources information systems, and employment law.

 

Strengthening the employer-employee relationship is a large part of my role. My job requires expertise as a HR generalist, which means I must be familiar with every human resource discipline to some level, whilst always focus on imc’s strategic goals. I get involved in great projects such as our Diversity and Inclusion, Onboarding and there is so much more I would love to. We have some fabulous people at imc, and part of my role is working with management to create an environment where people never want to leave.

What professional background or education do you have?

I started off as Secretary in the Head Office of a Private Bank in London which customers had to have a large amount of money to invest. We had customers from Saudi, Lottery Winners actors for example visit our plush offices in Mayfair which was a great experience. After a few years, I was fed up with commuting on the train and tube every day, so I manged to secure a job working closer to home, again staying in financial services.

 

The HR Manager happened to say to me at the photocopier that she had a vacancy for a HR Assistant, and I said: “Here I am!”. Then she said, ok you can start next week. A few months in, she asked me if I would like to go to University, and I did not need to be asked twice. So, I started studying Human Resources Management besides working, as a HR Assistant and have been working in HR ever since. That was a very fortunate situation and one that shaped my career in HR.

In which areas did you work before joining imc?

Other than working as Secretary for a few years, I have always worked in HR. Prior to joining imc I had never worked in the IT industry. That’s a little shift for me, because in financial services you have very detailed and strict processes to follow, especially around compliance and risk. Although we have strict compliance regulations etc at imc as well, there is no comparison to financial services. In general, its more laid back and flexible here.

Woman with red blazer

Which skills are important for your job?

Confidentially is key, a great communicator, objective, impartial, well-organised and a good listener… We have two ears and one mouth for a reason!

What do you like about your job most?

I really enjoy interviewing people. As I work in International, I have the luxury of speaking with people from across the globe which is so interesting. It is super important to make people feel relaxed in an interview so you can get the best out of them. I love to coach people also. However, that’s not all you need and do in HR and in my case it’s only a small part of what I do.

 

I also like the strategic part very much, like putting frameworks in place and focussing on the company’s employee agenda. More than anything I LOVE my team! I feel privileged to work with such intelligent kind individuals.

Jobslot

Ok, now let’s come to some more personal questions. You moved from London to a tiny city in Germany called Kollerbach, how come?

The oldest story of the world: I was on holiday in Austria skiing and met a German guy. It would be nice to tell you that our eyes locked across the piste, and I fell into his arms, but of course it was nothing like that and we met in a bar during Après Ski. He did not speak much English and I spoke no German at all. And I skied like Bridget Jones, and he was like James Bond… But somehow a fit.

Apres Ski

Did you experience big cultural differences or clashes between England and Germany?

The most stressful experience I had when I came to Germany (apart from driving on the other side of the road in an English car) was a visit in the German supermarket. I had no idea that in Germany it’s super important that you are very fast at the checkout. You must grab all your stuff as quickly as possible, pay and nearly run!

When I first went to a supermarket, I didn’t know that, and I thought the checkout assistance was so rude and I felt under such pressure. But like anything, once you know the rules you can play the game.

 

I find Germany very clean and feel very safe here. The German’s are fabulous. The lifestyle in Germany is much more outside that in the UK and now I have an E- Bike, courtesy of the imc scheme, there is no stopping me!

 

When it comes to a business context, I found it quite unbelievable that Germans address certain people by their surname because I haven’t called somebody Mr or Mrs since I was at school so that is very different. However, in general, the differences are less than you might think.

 

On the other hand, some clichés I heard I cannot confirm at all. I have heard is said that Germans write very blunt emails, or don’t do “small talk” which is untrue. It’s right that people are a little more direct, or as I like to say “logical! and get to the point quicker, but I like that. I feel very comfortable here and cannot wait to experience my first Christmas Party in Saarbrücken.

You have already worked for a couple of companies, what do you find special or different at imc?

For me it’s the people that make it. At imc it’s really hard work but fun and I genuinely think people care. People work hard but still the atmosphere is relaxed and everyone is friendly. In banks people tend to be sort of stuffy, suited and booted, at least when I worked there.

I love to come to work in my jeans for example. I do not have one black suit in my wardrobe anymore (just red jackets) and it is quite liberating. I really appreciate the flexibility at imc and the hybrid working model we have. Oh, and I love the fact that you can always find champagne in the fridge, although I’m never sure who brought it… Or even if I can drink it!

Breaker Job Slot Random Questions

Great, now let’s come to some random questions. Do you remember a very curious or funny situation you experienced in your job?

I could probably write a book about the things I experienced in the last 20 years, people would not believe what goes on in banks (and probably everywhere). I used to dread the Christmas parties as I could guarantee there would be a complaint following it, on my desk within a few days. I can’t think of one specific situation, well not that I could share anyway.

 

An amusing situation at imc happened at Christmas. Desi my colleague and I were in the office on 23rd December, and we were just finishing up when three “wise” men appeared at the office door and started to sing to us in their dulcet tones “We wish you a Merry Christmas”. I knew Raffael and Roman but when they left, I said to Desi: “Who was the guy in the green jacket on the end?” She was so shocked and said “Claire, you don’t know who Andreas Pohl is?”

You have to know that Andreas is one of the key people at imc and has worked here for years. Needless to say, I do now! (Sorry Andreas if you happen to read this… But you were wearing a mask).

What did you want to become as a child?

I wanted to become a vet. But I learned in a very young age that I was very squeamish, so that career was out of the window.

Do you also use e-learning privately?

Yes, I use Duolingo to learn German and get daily reminders to make my course!

What was the last book you read?

“Behind closed doors” which I call “beach books”. I read a lot of different types of genres, I am really interested in psychology books, and am a huge fan of Carl Jung.

Would you choose your profession again today?

Yes 100 %.

 

 

Great, thank you Claire for this lovely and funny interview and all the best for your private and professional life! 

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job slot: instructional designer

Career hoppers welcome

Conceptual or instructional designer, editor for digital learning: there are many names for his job.

In this interview Philipp tells us what he really does and why he needs a lot of tact and diplomacy for some clients.

Work or study?

How to become a Media Designer – with an  Apprenticeship or degree? Vanessa Pesch also faced these question after having finished school.

In the job slot she tells, why she decided for an apprenticeship in imc's content team.

IMC CAREER

Would you like to know more about imc as an employer? Then take a look at our career section, maybe there is a suitable position for you.

We are also always happy to receive unsolicited applications!

imc Job Slot: Unique people. Random questions.

Random questions, regularly new faces and jobs – that's the job slot of imc.

Jobslot Logo

Contact person

I have been working in the Marketing & Communication Team at imc since March 2019.

Communication, creating unique content and social media are my passion.

 

"One can not not communicate" - Paul Watzlawik.

To explain complex content in an understandable way and thus make the topic of e-Learning accessible to everyone is an exciting challenge every day.

 

Privately I love to read, play poker and travel a lot.

I am always happy to receive feedback or suggestions.

Photo of Nadine Kreutz
Nadine Kreutz
Communication Manager
Photo of imc colleagues
Job Slot
Unique people. Random questions.

Living the dream as Hosting Engineer: career start with determination and plenty of high spirits

Even as a child, she dissambled computers and was curious to learn exactly how they worked. For Suwhathi Sutheswaran it was always clear that she would take up a technical profession. In the Job Slot interview, she reveals how she became a hosting engineer at imc and what she thinks of the supposed male domains in IT.

Suwhathi Sutheswaran

Suwhathi Sutheswaran

Job | Hosting Engineer

Working in | Saarbrücken, Germany

Worked at imc since | 2021

Super power | Determined, willing to learn & cheerful 

Favourite food | Dad’s home-made Indian food

imc Job Slot seperator job and career

Hello Suwhathi! First of all, welcome at imc. You only joined us a few months ago. Did you get off to a good start?

Thank you. Yes, my initial experiences were great. All my colleagues are extremely nice, and I’m thrilled about the welcome they offered. That was particularly exciting for me, because this is my first graduate job.

How did you hear about imc?

During my studies in Communications Technology, I sought advice on various jobs and graduate opportunities. I was unsure what exact role would suit me, as I take a fairly broad approach and have many interests. Even after completing some internships and holding various part-time jobs, I had still not quite figured out, which direction I should take.

My career advisor suggested I look at business consultancy, and I originally applied for that field with imc. My interview was very encouraging, and I was very much able to see myself in that role.

 

But then things took a different turn. It was quite funny. HR not only looked at the Consulting vacancy, but also at a position in Hosting. Since I have a sound base of technical know-how, they asked if I could also imagine taking on that role. I thought that was a really exciting idea. Soon after, I interviewed for that position with Matthias Fay, the Head of Hosting and now my manager. Again, it just felt right.

 

So, I was left to choose between Consulting and Hosting. The decision was not easy, but in the end, I went for the Hosting team – and I’m really happy there.

job slot chosing direction

What exactly do you do as a Hosting Engineer?

In very simple terms, hosting means providing webservices on the internet. In our case, that is our customers’ learning management systems. For the greatest part, these are hosted in AWS or Azure Cloud.

As Hosting Engineers, we are responsible for installing and monitoring these systems, make adjustments for changes and deliver software updates. We also carry out maintenance and ensure that all systems are up to date.

 

Other key aspects are database management and backups. It is always worth having a backup in case something crashes. It’s very much the same as with a personal computer. Right now, we are very focused on simplifying certain processes. Many tasks are still performed manually, and we aim to automate them, so they can simply run in the background.

What do you like best about your work?

I really like how versatile the job is, but also love how the different departments collaborate. For example, we are working closely with Support and Business Consulting. That allows you to gain a much wider range of insights, and I find that very exciting.

 

I also truly appreciate my colleagues making a great deal of time for me. Given that I’m just starting out in my career, I have to learn most things from scratch. Here, everyone supports me and really gives me a chance to grow into the projects and my responsibilities. That sort of development and encouragement is not something I take for granted. However, I want to do the job and I want to learn, and I think my colleagues know and honour that.

Job Slot Teamwork

What skills are particularly important in your job?

Naturally, an interest and a good understanding of technical matters are key. On top of that, it is important to focus on solutions, take responsibility, be diligent and stay focused. After all, we interact with sensitive client systems and data, and they need to be handled with great care.

 

I believe willingness to learn is a vital aspect, since the technology is always changing. That is something to always keep in mind – You never stop learning, you have to keep at it. Of course, team spirit and good communication skills are hugely important, but that applies to most jobs.

On a scale of 1-10, how well did your vocational training prepare you for your current role?

Well, I have to say, my degree in Communications Technology alone was not really enough. I did some additional courses on the side to feel more prepared while also boosting my prospects on the job market. Together, that probably adds up to a five.

Jobslot

Now, a few random questions going beyond your work itself: What are you looking forward to each day the most?

My fiancé lives in Paris, and we mostly speak on the phone after work. That always gives me lots of energy when I’m tired at the end of my work day. It also helps me wind down in the evening.

Please complete this sentence: To me, digitalisation means ...

Above all, flexibility. Our hybrid and flexible work model lets me choose whether I want to work from home or come into the office. That is very convenient.

What did you want to be as a kid and why?

I always knew I wanted to do something technical. As a kid, I was always tinkering with old monitors and computers. I desperately wanted to know what they look like on the inside, and how everything works. That made a degree in that field an obvious choice.

What is your favourite movie?

I really like all types of movies, from action through romance to comedy.

Who do you look up to in your professional or personal life?

Back in my university days, I watched the anime series One Piece. It very much appealed to me. It’s about a boy called Luffy who is travelling the world in his search for a treasure that is said to be impossible to find. Yet, he never gives up. It really inspired me, and I could somewhat identify with that: I am also very determined and ambitious, and I never give up. I doubt I would have come this far without those traits.

 

Apart from that, women in IT always inspire me. You often hear that women are still an exception in this sector, or even that IT and women are different worlds. That view couldn’t be further from the truth. While I think we have a long way to go, a few inspirational women have already achieved a lot.

Final question: Which country are you most keen to visit?

I definitely want to go to the USA, Australia, Singapore and Southern Europe.

 

Thank you very much Suwhathi and all the best for your future career!

RELATED CONENT
job slot: instructional designer

Career hoppers welcome

Conceptual or instructional designer, editor for digital learning: there are many names for his job.

In this interview Philipp tells us what he really does and why he needs a lot of tact and diplomacy for some clients.

Work or study?

How to become a Media Designer – with an  Apprenticeship or degree? Vanessa Pesch also faced these question after having finished school.

In the job slot she tells, why she decided for an apprenticeship in imc's content team.

IMC CAREER

Would you like to know more about imc as an employer? Then take a look at our career section, maybe there is a suitable position for you.

We are also always happy to receive unsolicited applications!

imc Job Slot: Unique people. Random questions.

Random questions, regularly new faces and jobs – that's the job slot of imc.

Jobslot Logo

Contact person

I have been working in the Marketing & Communication Team at imc since March 2019.

Communication, creating unique content and social media are my passion.

 

"One can not not communicate" - Paul Watzlawik.

To explain complex content in an understandable way and thus make the topic of e-Learning accessible to everyone is an exciting challenge every day.

 

Privately I love to read, play poker and travel a lot.

I am always happy to receive feedback or suggestions.

Photo of Nadine Kreutz
Nadine Kreutz
Communication Manager
imc employees conducting business admin
Article
Trainee Office Management

Traineeship in Office Management – A qualification that opens many doors

From the perspective of a trainee

Marc Müller, imc

imc AG offers vocational training in a range of fields. This includes IT, new media, and accounting. One of those trainees is me, Marc Müller, 24 years old.

 

Since I’ve always been good with numbers, I was looking for a traineeship that would allow me to utilise this talent. I decided on a traineeship as office management professional with a business management and controlling elective. Thus, the Finance department became my primary place of work for the next 2.5 years, but I was also able to contribute my skills in other departments.

My early days at imc: From intern to trainee

I was given the opportunity to gain some experience with imc before starting my actual vocational training. During my interview, I was offered the opportunity to do a 3-month internship first, so I could gain insights into the profession and the company. After these 3 months, I already knew that both role and employer were a good match for me. Especially the positive atmosphere at work inspired me. The actual traineeship started in August 2019.

 

In the course of my internship, I had already become familiar with the processes and workflows in my department, allowing me to take on my first real tasks from day one without relying on people to explain everything to me. Initially, those tasks were limited to accounting files – invoices, bank statements and similar documents. However, I was soon assigned more complex tasks to complete independently. I learned how to work with SAP and how to record all accounting processes in that software.

Of course, help was always on hand if I was stuck, and someone would go through the issue with me. As time went on, I became more and more independent, and even took on the creation of the full payment run, that is the payment of all due invoices. This was then checked and transferred to the banking program for payment.

imc employees

A journey through the company

One thing that stands out with an office management qualification is that I could gain knowledge in various departments. My trainer Markus Dilly introduced me to controlling tasks and things like proper invoicing. I also created order confirmations for accepted offers and created the relevant projects in a special online tool.

 

I completed work placements in three different imc departments, each lasting 4-6 weeks. An experienced team member would be assigned to me as a mentor for each placement, who would walk me through the tasks and particularities of that department.

 

First up was Sales. Here, I gained first experiences in dealing with customers. While I didn’t call companies myself, I often listened into the telephone meetings. I learned how to best present the benefits of our products to win over the customer, and how to react when the tone gets a little rougher.

 

In the secretary’s office, I processes incoming and outgoing post, as well as orders for individual imc employees. The corona pandemic cut my time in this department short, and since we also fast-tracked my traineeship, it was time to move onto the next area.

 

My time in Marketing was far more creative than in other departments. I learned how to create Instagram stories and write articles for our website. I was also shown how to create public awareness for our company, as well as inform colleagues within the company about the latest developments.

 

Marketing Team with Marc Müller

l.t.r: Carlotta Pudelek, Marc Müller, Sara Emosivwe, Doreen Hartmann, Nadine Kreutz

Digital lessons and flexible work

2 days a week, I went to vocational school, which would change things up a bit. We acquired a foundation for our future professional life. Subjects ranged from accounting through human resource management to marketing, and also covered all sorts of tasks expected in an office environment.

 

The school had to close due to the pandemic, and face-to-face classes were suspended for almost 1 year. We switched to an online format with lectures and exercise sheets to fill the gap as much as possible. Nevertheless, I was glad to finally return to school.

 

Of course, we also felt the pandemic at imc, but at least the home office arrangements allowed me to keep working from home. I only had to come to the office once or twice a week to print off documents and process accumulated files.

... and after qualification?

I have now arrived at the end of my traineeship, and I am now thinking about the next steps for my career path. I am thrilled to know that I have a very good chance of a permanent role in Controlling – the area my trainer works in. That means, I can stay with imc in the future. Thanks to my great colleagues and the variety of the tasks, it never gets boring here.

RELATED CONENT

Work or study?

This is a question many students face after graduating from school. This was also the case for Vanessa Pesch, who completed an apprenticeship as a media designer at imc and tells us more about it in the interview.

imc employee Doreen Hartmann

Being a working student at imc

In the Job Slot, Doreen Hartmann, a former working student in marketing, talks about her journey from being a working student job at imc to a full-time employee.
IMC CAREER

Would you like to know more about imc as an employer? Then take a look at our career section, maybe there is a suitable position for you.

We are also always happy to receive unsolicited applications!

imc Job Slot: Unique people. Random questions.

Random questions, regularly new faces and jobs – that's the job slot of imc.

Jobslot Logo

Contact person

I have been working in the Marketing & Communication Team at imc since March 2019.

Communication, creating unique content and social media are my passion.

 

"One can not not communicate" - Paul Watzlawik.

To explain complex content in an understandable way and thus make the topic of e-Learning accessible to everyone is an exciting challenge every day.

 

Privately I love to read, play poker and travel a lot.

I am always happy to receive feedback or suggestions.

Photo of Nadine Kreutz
Nadine Kreutz
Communication Manager
entertaining employees
Insights
From a Working Student at imc

My journey as a working student at imc: More than making coffee and photocopies

Opening the doors to my dream job with a little courage and motivation

At university, theory is often the main focus, while practical application is skimmed over at best. That’s why it pays to arrange an internship or student job in a company – and it’s never too early to apply for that. This prepares students for their future professional life and helps to avoid the struggles frequently experienced when looking for an entry-level role. Quite often, it is these very jobs that become a ticket to the dream job.  

  

That is exactly what happened to me – Doreen Hartmann, former working student in Marketing at imc AG. In this article, I will share everything about my journey at imc and how motivation and courage can become a recipe for success. But let’s start at the beginning... 

Doreen Hartmann imc

Doreen Hartmann

Junior Marketing and Communications Manager at imc since October 2021

Motivation and preparation beat professional experience

In September 2019, I had not long started my business administration degree at Saarland University in Saarbrücken. The perfect time to figure out what I wanted to do after graduation and gain some early work experience in that field. Of course, that meant I needed a student job.   

 

All said and done. In my degree course, I really liked marketing and management. I’m not much of a number cruncher and generally have more of a creative mindset. Therefore, I started looking for a student job in marketing. Soon after, I noticed a vacancy posted by imc. However, I was unable to meet all requirements listed in the job profile, because I had only worked in catering and retail – as many students do.   

 

I still tried my luck regardless, and soon received an invitation for an interview! A job offer followed just three days later, and I clinched a contract as a working student in the Marketing & Communications department. While I lacked professional experience, I scored with good preparation, dedication, and motivation. That was the first step in my journey with imc.   

Student Hats Breaker Image

Starting from scratch: Back to learning, learning and more learning

I started my student job in October 2019 with little marketing knowledge, but a generous helping of enthusiasm. The first few weeks were marked by a wealth of new expertise, comprehensive processes I needed to learn and incomprehensible terminology. I somewhat felt as if I was back at school. It seemed like I had to start from scratch and learn everything anew. As I would later find out, this did pay off.  

  

Initially, I was given minor tasks like copywriting for our social media channels, event preparation and smaller research tasks. At this point, I was also introduced to a new marketing automation tool – and I was involved in its implementation from day one. I could participate in all workshops, which afforded me the opportunity to gain sufficient knowledge so that I could take on my own tasks.   

Stepping out of the sidelines and into the action

My area of responsibility gradually and consistently grew, and I was soon entrusted with my first own projects. I had the opportunity to help implement our new website and handled our internal “success ticker” that informs imc employees about the previous month’s achievements. I also took on the editing of use cases for our main product – the imc Learning Suite – and the preparation of our external newsletter E-Learning Insights that keeps anyone interested in e-learning up to date on the latest e-learning trends. We all live by the motto: “Get involved! There are better things to do than making coffee and photocopies!”

imc Marketing Team

From disasters to showpieces

With that, my responsibilities also increased. If you were being very diplomatic, my first newsletter creation might pass as having room for improvement. Looking back, it was a bit of a disaster. Thinking about how my work is sent out to hundreds of people and that errors cannot be rectified did not help, and it made me nervous. But we all know: Practice makes perfect, and challenges help you grow.   

  

That is exactly how my newsletter disaster developed into a newsletter showpiece, and only a few weeks later, I was not only permanently responsible for our E-Learning Insights Newsletter, but also for our exclusive customer newsletter.   

My impression: At imc, working students are full-fledged team members

In my personal experience, imc considers working students full-fledged members of the company. Instead of simply delegating unthankful tasks, people at imc take great care to ensure working students learn and develop. You participate in monthly team meetings, project-related activities and internal events. Of course, the benefits don’t stop with work: We all love our CandyBar, additional leave and employee discounts. Interacting with colleagues is a way of life: Colleagues from different departments enjoy a quick chat in the kitchen while making coffee, catch up over lunch or toast to the weekend on a Friday afternoon. 

Doreen Hartmann imc
At imc, all working students are part of the team – and that feels great!

Flexibility and personal development

As a student, flexibility was also extremely important to me, as I had to juggle university life, work, and leisure. The company was very flexible and let me set a schedule for the days and times I would come to the office to ensure that my work did not compromise my studies. Especially during the often stressful exam period, the option to move working days and make up the hours in the semester break was available.

 

Personal development and networking across city and country boundaries is also made easy. Various internal employee programmes are available to all employees, and that specifically includes working students. That includes the Brand Ambassador Programme, as well as various projects and events on Diversity and Female Empowerment which strengthen diversity in the company. Other activities, internal events and regular updates from the Executive Board strengthen solidarity and team spirit, which is a top priority in the imc Marketing Team anyway. At imc, all working students are part of the team – and that feels great!

Degree in the pocket ... and now?

My degree course was coming to a close, and I kept asking myself: What next? Thankfully, imc offered me a position as Junior Marketing & Communications Manager, allowing me to continue my journey. At the interface between Marketing and Communication, I will now support my own campaigns, maintain internal channels, and even start my own coverage of certain topics in addition to my existing projects.   

  

I can also apply the marketing knowledge gained as a working student in global processes and product campaigns, guaranteeing 360-degree training. As a permanent employee, I also benefit from the flexibility of hybrid work, and am free to decide whether I want to work from home or come to the office. Now, exactly two years after I started my student job, I’m sitting here, writing my very first article about my early days at imc, looking back at my journey in satisfaction. 

imc Marketing Team

My tip: Go for it!

Finally, I want to send everyone toeing the line for their start into their professional on their way with this piece of advice: Go for it! Work experience is not always the be all and end all. Motivation, interest, and ambition will often count for more. Let’s be honest: When a company is hiring, they will often ask for specific knowledge and skills. Yet, you have to start somewhere. If nobody gives you a chance when you enter the job market, where is that experience meant to come from?

 

So, let’s hear it for all companies that open the door for us students and newcomers and let us enter the professional world! Looking back, I highly recommend seizing this opportunity during your studies.

 

 

What are you waiting for? Apply before someone beats you to it!

RELATED CONENT

Work or study?

This is a question many students face after graduating from school. This is also the case for Vanessa Pesch, who completed an apprenticeship as a media designer at imc and tells us more about it in the interview.

...From the perspective of a trainee

What does an apprenticeship in office management really look like? Marc Müller, trainee for office management at imc, tells us exactly and reports on his path and his experiences during the training.

IMC CAREER

Would you like to know more about imc as an employer? Then take a look at our career section, maybe there is a suitable position for you.

We are also always happy to receive unsolicited applications!

imc Job Slot: Unique people. Random questions.

Random questions, regularly new faces and jobs – that's the job slot of imc.

Jobslot Logo

Contact person

I have been working permanently in the imc Marketing & Communication Team since 2021. The mix of creative content creation, social media and online marketing activities is what excites me most about my job.

 

My goal is to inspire people with creative and innovative content and to make the imc brand more tangible.

 

My passion besides my job? Travelling a lot and discovering the most beautiful places in the world. I'm always happy to receive feedback or suggestions at [email protected]!

Doreen Hartmann imc
Doreen Hartmann
Junior Marketing and Communication Manager
Photo of imc colleagues
Job Slot
Interview with a learning strategy expert

“The users decide whether or not a learning offer is successful”

It’s all about the people: Why introducing a learning management system is more than just getting another software.

“When companies introduce a learning management system, they need to understand that it is more than just another software. The objective must be to help people master the tasks they face in their job,” says Uwe Hofschröer, Head of the Learning Strategy Consulting Team at imc. In this role, he offers companies holistic advice on all aspects of digital learning.

 

He strives to place the employees at the heart of the offer, rather than the system or learning content. In this Job Slot interview, he also shares how he arrived at this job, and why he might as well be a note pad.

Uwe Hofschröer

Uwe Hofschröer

Job | Head of Learning Strategy Consulting

Working in | Essen, Germany

Worked at imc since | 2017

Super power | Virtually interested in everything

Favourite food | Apple cake

Jobslot

Hello Uwe! Your job title sounds a bit like buzzword bingo. What exactly is it about?

The job title is rather abstract because it covers a broad spectrum of topics and tasks. The basic idea of learning strategy consulting is that we support customers whenever they face a more complex issue. Rather than offering advice on the introduction of a learning management system (LMS) or the key aspects of content development, learning strategy consulting focuses on the development of a holistic learning offer.

This is particularly relevant for companies making a fresh start with their digital learning offer and companies with little experience in this field. We help them consider all aspects and create a framework. Even larger companies will face new issues from time to time, and we then help them address these.

Can you give us a specific example for topics you get involved in?

Digital onboarding would be “our thing.” It is a fairly new topic for many companies. Of course, you can hire a concept designer to create a training course for you. The difference is that we are looking at the learner experience as a whole, rather than just the training course itself.

The learners are at the heart of the offer, and we need to start by identifying their needs. What content do they need? Which learning formats are suitable? How do these need to be designed? Next, we naturally examine how the training can be embedded in the LMS: How do we integrate it into the learning paths? How is the training presented? What interface does the learner see?

 

We are not restricting our evaluation to the content or the LMS but consider the entire learning journey. In a nutshell, learning strategy consulting covers traditional consultancy and needs assessments, analysis, and concepts design. We often support client projects for longer periods, coordinate the implementation or act as sparring partners.

Uwe Hofschröer
The learning status “completed” means nothing.
Uwe Hofschröer
Head of Learning Strategy Consulting
imc AG

Is your offer geared towards medium-sized companies or major corporations?

It’s not really clear-cut like that. Naturally, many SMEs never paid much attention to digital learning in the past and are keen to catch up now. Corona has certainly given many a big push in that direction.

However, many big corporations with a considerable track record in corporate learning and entire departments dedicated to learning and development are trying to move on from their focus on traditional face-to-face training. They might have employed the odd web-based training course, but now realise that this entire field is changing.

 

They will often lack experience or expertise in switching to hybrid or digital concepts and integrating them in a meaningful way. It’s also worth noting that attitudes towards proofs of learning success are changing.

The learning status “completed” only means that the learner has completed the training course. It offers no indication of whether the learner actually understood the contents or whether it will help them in their daily work.

imc Job Slot seperator job and career

How do you get a job like yours? What is your professional background?

Initially, I studied social sciences, aiming to do something in the field of journalism. However, I quickly realised that I’m not really cut out for that and took various courses in other fields as part of my degree. That also included technology, sociology and business management. In the early 2000s, I joined a research team examining what was a revolutionary subject back then: How universities can leverage the internet.

 

You could say that was my first venture into the world of digital learning, even if that term did not yet exist at the time. After this project, I took on a job as a concept designer with a professional development agency, where I initially created online and sales training, as well as early software training. After some time, I was given accounts that required me to support digital handbooks for car dealers. This gave me an insight into software projects and concept creation for learning platforms. I also learned how these platforms and courses are rolled out in large companies. It was a great learning experience.

 

Then, I joined imc. My background – especially the experience and insights gained with various customers and projects – helps me a lot in my current role.

I have to say that seven – or even five – years ago, I would never have thought that a job like this would exist. Back then, the professional development design and strategy was very much a company’s inhouse competence. However, the demand for multi-faceted consultations is increasing rapidly, not only for technological issues. The entire field of learning and development is quickly gaining ground – and complexity. It is difficult for companies to cover all the relevant aspects.

Uwe Hofschröer
Only the users decide whether a learning offer is a success or a failure.
Uwe Hofschröer
Head of Learning Strategy Consulting
imc AG

What do you especially like about your job?

It is always exciting and full of surprises. Each project and each set of customer requirements is different. There is very little routine. You need to engage with the customer and be tactful to find out what they need.

It also works in my favour that the job is very generalist in nature. I’m not a subject-matter expert. I know a lot of things in many fields, and somehow need to bring those pieces of knowledge together. All the different aspects – technical details of the LMS, different learning formats, change management processes – impact the learning culture as well as the corporate culture. We bring them together.

 

One thing that is extremely important to me, and I always try to convey to our customers is this: Neither a system nor a specific training course are at the heart of corporate learning. It is about the people. Employees want or need to learn something to do their job better. Their needs must therefore be a top priority.

After all, only the users decide whether a learning offer is a success or a failure. If they don’t see something that helps them, the offer is wasted.

Jobslot

That’s an interesting take! Now, I have some random questions for you. Ready? What is the most unusual thing you experienced in your job?

I found myself in a rather odd situation shortly before I joined imc. I was still working for my previous employer but had already handed in my notice and signed my contract with imc. My boss was aware of that, but the customer we had a meeting with that day had no idea. The purpose of the meeting? Helping them choose an LMS. Various providers pitched their solutions, including Sven R. Becker who is now on the imc Executive Board, but was Head of Sales at the time. While we both knew, the customer was unaware of my upcoming change of employer. Fortunately, the customer had to use a different tender procedure, so I was “off the hook” and did not have to make a recommendation on which system to choose.

Please complete this sentence: When dealing with colleagues, what matters the most is ...

... lots of communication, creating as much clarity and transparency as possible. While not always easy in practice, I also think a degree of composure, a reasonably relaxed attitude is important. We are all human. Mistakes happen and there has to be room for that. It’s OK. It’s part of the learning process.

imc coworkers

What do you think your colleagues appreciate about you?

I would say my candour and my rather positive mindset.

If you could choose again, would you still decide on the same job?

Yes. It offers variety, is challenging and puts me in touch with many interesting people.

Sweet or savoury?

Savoury. I love my peanut puffs.

If you were an office supply, what would you be? Why?

I would likely be a note pad because it is extremely versatile. Note pads are also a great reminder that it’s worth keeping duplicates and older things. The mere existence of digital equivalents need not mean that they are better.

 

 

Thanks for the great insights, Uwe and all the best furthermore!

RELATED CONENT
Photo of Michael Schlothauer

Developing the learning of the future

How do we actually learn? What tools and strategies are there to make learning more efficient? How is learning fun and can it be made more individual? We talked to Michael Schlothauer about these and other questions.

Conductors of the Software Orchestra

The conductors of software and heroes behind the scenes: That's what product managers actually are. Like Lia Ghita from Sibiu, who as product manager is jointly responsible for imc's main product, the imc Learning Suite.

IMC CAREER

Would you like to know more about imc as an employer? Then take a look at our career section, maybe there is a suitable position for you.

We are also always happy to receive unsolicited applications!

imc Job Slot: Unique people. Random questions.

Random questions, regularly new faces and jobs – that's the job slot of imc.

Jobslot Logo

Contact person

I have been working in the Marketing & Communication Team at imc since March 2019.

Communication, creating unique content and social media are my passion.

 

"One can not not communicate" - Paul Watzlawik.

To explain complex content in an understandable way and thus make the topic of e-Learning accessible to everyone is an exciting challenge every day.

 

Privately I love to read, play poker and travel a lot.

I am always happy to receive feedback or suggestions.

Photo of Nadine Kreutz
Nadine Kreutz
Communication Manager
Photo of imc colleagues
Job Slot
Unique people. Random questions.

What number crunchers and financial heroines see behind the numbers

Interviewing two members of the finance department who refuse to match the stereotype

The thought of analysing figures and tables in a structured manner and carefully checking cash inflows and outflows makes many people shudder. However, if we all had that attitude, it would be hard to avoid descending into chaos. That is why people like Xenia Reiter and Markus Dilly are so important. They both work in the finance department at imc Saarbrücken, and offer us an insight into their work and different areas of responsibility. They share what makes their role so attractive to them.

Xenia Ritter, imc AG

Xenia Reiter

Job | Accountant

Working in | Saarbruecken, Germany

Worked at imc since | 2019

Super power | cheerful and willing to help

Favourite food | Pelimeni (Russian speciality, filled dumplings)

Markus Dilly, imc AG

Markus Dilly

Job | Head of Controlling

Working in | Saarbruecken, Germany

Worked at imc since | 2012

Super power | Reliability

Favourite food | Pizza & Burger

imc Job Slot seperator job and career

Hello, you two! I am so happy you could find the time! Tell us about yourselves and your tasks.

Xenia: I have been part of the Accounting team at imc since 2019. I am responsible for all accounting matters of the company in Switzerland, the UK and Singapore. That includes all the tasks in connection with the monthly and annual financial statements, as well as the advance VAT returns in each country.

Markus: I started as a working student in Controlling in 2012, and took on a permanent role in 2015. I recently started leading a small team comprising our two trainees, our working student and a junior controller. I am also responsible for international invoicing and procurement management, and admin the Projectfacts system we use as a time recording and invoicing tool and to record holidays. Sales enquiries and client projects also come together in Controlling. On top of that, I support our line manager Peter in the preparation of monthly and annual financial statements.

Let’s get a bit more specific. What does your daily work look like?

Xenia: Like in any accounting role, I check lots of receipts and supporting documents. I am also responsible for the salaries in “my” countries, check and post bank statements, credit card statements, cash advances and so forth. While that might sound a bit monotonous at first glance, I look at it like this: The figures illustrate the interrelationships and reflect corporate actions. My job is to check if everything matches up, specifications are complied with and question transactions if necessary. Even though the work flow is always the same, it is important to check it each time and pay attention

Markus: There is no such thing as a typical day at work for me. I have no big project to keep working on, but many different tasks. Some tasks come in almost on a daily basis – giving new colleagues access to certain systems, assigning order numbers or creating new contracts or projects in our systems.

 

I am also often in contact with Sales, and we check things like contracts or quotations together, highlight particularities and check if the order value is adequate for the scope of the order. As the process from order creation through invoicing to booking the invoice in SAP is supported by various systems, coordination with my colleagues is very important.

Finance Department at imc

Did you always know you wanted to work with numbers?

Xenia: Yes, absolutely. I always wanted to work in accounting. I really enjoy it. I like numbers and what is hidden behind them. We also have a great team, collaborate in great harmony and always support each other. I am really comfortable here. I also handle all financial matters at home, and am in charge of accounting for the martial arts club I run together with my husband.

Markus: I suppose. I always knew that I am good with numbers and would study something in that area. But if you asked me for my dream job, I’d probably go off in a different direction – like games journalist or games designer. However, I am realistic and was very aware of my strengths and weaknesses at a young age. I know my way around the figures, I always enjoyed it to play with numbers, so my business degree was an obvious choice. And since imc is also involved in gamification, I did find my place!

Let’s talk traineeships: Markus, you said you first came to imc as a working student. How did that work?

Markus: Yes, I first did my Bachelor in Technical Business Management in Zweibrücken, and then embarked on a Master’s with a Finance major at Saarland University. While studying for my Master’s, I visited an on-campus job fair and started talking to Scheer GmbH. Back then, they had no vacancies for student jobs, but they were nice enough to forward my application to imc. So I joined imc in a roundabout way – and stayed.

EDITOR'S NOTE

Like Scheer GmbH and several other companies, imc AG belongs to the innovation network of Scheer Holding. Prof. Dr. August-Wilhelm Scheer is Managing Director of Scheer Holding, Founder and Chairman of imc's Supervisory Board.

Xenia, your application process was a bit unusual. What was special about it?

Xenia: I left another job to join imc, and was pleasantly surprised by the speed of the recruitment process. Back then, I called Melanie in HR to clarify a couple of questions I had about the vacancy. I then emailed my application, and two days later, I attended a job interview with Melanie and our line manager Peter. The following day, I already received my job offer.

HR Department at imc

On a scale of 1-10, how well did your vocational training prepare you for your current role?

Xenia: Looking at the business degree itself, I’d say an 8. I gained an excellent overview and was introduced to many topics. Practical things, like how to structure a balance sheet or what sound accounting practice entails – I use that every day. I still remember that one of my first lectures was on this topic, and I loved it. Even though I had some difficulties with debits and credits in the beginning, it was all logical once I got my head around it.
We also learned to develop some sensitivity towards certain issues, and were shown practical examples to highlight potential stumbling blocks.

 

Of course, a lot is learned on the job. Every company will have different requirements for line managers, workflows and practical applications. All you can do is pick it up as time goes by.

Markus: No more than a 6. I would say that studying is more about teaching yourself and learning to be self-disciplined. Of course, you gain specialist knowledge and learn the terminology, but there are stark differences in how that is applied in different companies. University only scratches the surface. You really only delve into it on the job.

What do you appreciate most about each other?

Xenia: Markus is always positive. No matter what issue you ask him about or report to him, he always has a solution and never leaves you hanging with your unanswered questions. You can always rely on him. He knows his stuff and never gets flustered, even in stressful situations.

Markus: There is this stereotype of finance people hiding away in some dark chamber, refusing to talk to anyone and seeing nothing but their figures. In our department, you won’t find any of that. We have a great atmosphere. Xenia is a particularly cheerful and happy person and always willing to help. Her expertise is very broad and she is always willing to listen. It’s great fun working with her!

Jobslot

OK. Now I have some random questions for each of you. Markus, what characteristics or skills are particularly important in your job?

Markus: You should be precise and – maybe even obsessively – pay attention to detail. You need to be reliable and love numbers. Strong perseverance is never amiss, either.

What's your favourite way to start your day, Xenia?

Xenia: Open the windows and have a coffee! I’m usually the first one up, and like to enjoy the tranquillity for a while in the morning before my family wakes up.

imc coworkes meeting for a coffee

Markus, what's your favourite movie?

Markus: Great question – I love movies! In general, I totally dig Tarantino films, but if I have to pick my two favourite movies, it has to be Pulp Fiction and Fight Club.

Xenia, which imc office would you like to visit?

Xenia: I imagine Singapore must be beautiful. Having said that, I would also like to go to Switzerland. That would be a great contrast. London should also be quite interesting.

Markus, your top 3 hashtags for the imc?

#creative #learning #empowerMe

A final question for Xenia: Who is your best-dressed colleague?

Xenia: That’s difficult to say in these times when you rarely see each other in the office. But Kerstin from Marketing always looks rather neat.

 

 

 

Thank you very much to both of you and all the best for your future!

RELATED CONENT

Daily business: Treasure hunter

"I'm like a treasure hunter digging for the gold-nuggets in our system", says Ivana Lee from the Singapore office. She told about her experiences as Managing Director Asia and what is different when working for a German company.

Conductors of the Software Orchestra

Mostly the hidden champions behind the scenes but actually the conductors of the software: That is how Product Manager Lia from Sibiu explains her job. She is resposnible for imc's main product, the imc Learning Suite.

IMC CAREER

Would you like to know more about imc as an employer? Then take a look at our career section, maybe there is a suitable position for you.

We are also always happy to receive unsolicited applications!

imc Job Slot: Unique people. Random questions.

Random questions, regularly new faces and jobs – that's the job slot of imc.

Jobslot Logo

Contact person

I have been working in the Marketing & Communication Team at imc since March 2019.

Communication, creating unique content and social media are my passion.

 

"One can not not communicate" - Paul Watzlawik.

To explain complex content in an understandable way and thus make the topic of e-Learning accessible to everyone is an exciting challenge every day.

 

Privately I love to read, play poker and travel a lot.

I am always happy to receive feedback or suggestions.

Photo of Nadine Kreutz
Nadine Kreutz
Communication Manager