woman relaxing behind laptop
Employment Trends:
Quiet Quitting
How to harness the power of employee-driven learning and development (L&D)

Harness the power of employee-led L&D to combat 'quiet quitting'

The talent landscape is undergoing a seismic shift as organisations grapple with the aftermath of the Great Resignation. In an era where employee engagement has become the holy grail, we saw the emergence of quiet quitting. Coined by Brian Creely in 2022, the term relates to employees who only work to the job description. They don't go 'above and beyond', and won't put in even the slightest extra effort or time into their work above what's set out in the job spec.

 

Inspired by the shifting workplace attitudes and expectations post-pandemic, employees now favour remote and hybrid working. They're driven by a desire of greater work-life balance. A recent AT&T study found the hybrid work model is expected to grow from 42% in 2021 to 81% in 2024. Quiet quitting for many represents a disengagement from working life, and a drop in productivity and efficiency.

 

So how much of a problem is quiet quitting, and how can businesses address the trend?

man asleep at work
A study by Gallup found that 69% of employees born after 1989 have 'quietly quit' jobs. Big brands like Facebook are 'turning up the heat' to address the problem. Tech giants are introducing aggressive targets and limiting team growth to maximise output from its current talent pool. Whether these measures can be truly effective relies on multiple factors. That said, many brands are learning that it's more effective to meet their employees halfway.

Impact of quiet quitting on worker attitudes

To understand the post-pandemic trends in relation to training, we partnered with independent survey company Research Without Barriers. Finding out employee attitudes to training in 2023 gave us a clearer picture of the wider issue of employee disengagement in the workplace. 

 

 

We surveyed 2,000 UK workers, split between 1,000 managers and 1,000 non-managerial employees. The surveyed managers have over 15 years of work experience and work in companies of more than 15 employees. The surveyed non-managerial employees have a maximum of three years of experience, and work in companies with more than 15 employees. The goal of these sample requirements was to give us better insight into the attitudes held at different levels of seniority. In the context of a rise in quiet quitting, the results were surprising – and promising. 

Is 'quiet quitting' impacting wider employee engagement?

A common belief about quiet quitting is that employees are disengaging because they don't want to work hard or build careers. Our research actually suggests that there remains a strong desire for personal and professional growth among the UK workforce.

 

A staggering 86% of respondents expressed a willingness to stay longer with their employer – if the employer offers more L&D opportunities. Employees also aren't necessarily interested solely for what a company offers them. Almost all (94%) believed that the company would also benefit if they were given more training. In other words, workers are still willing and interested in engaging with their employers, supporting business goals, and building careers. But they are seeking fulfilment and a mutually beneficial relationship with their employer. This conclusion is reinforced by the social shifts we saw with the Great Resignation, where workers sought work that enhanced their lives.

 

Our findings underscore the pivotal role that learning & development plays in engaging employees. It provides them with fulfilling work lives – directly impacting their engagement with their roles and countering quiet quitting.

Managerial involvement in training

Managers play a crucial role in nurturing a culture of learning and development within their teams. The survey results revealed that 59% of managers recognise the importance of training in keeping employees engaged and motivated in their roles. In fact, 78% of managers also acknowledged that training had a positive impact on their own commitment and engagement. Generally, business leaders are aware that learning and development have a direct impact on employee engagement at all levels. Understanding this gives us a tool to address quiet quitting within an organisation – where employees are willing and able.

man leading employees

How to deliver employee-led L&D

Despite the awareness, many organisations are falling short in leveraging learning and development as a tool for employee engagement, retention and skills enhancement. Only 29% of managers actively involve employees in selecting and integrating training programmes for their professional development. And 42% of employees reported having no active involvement in training beyond participation. This suggests that many employers, while aware of the benefits of training, are missing out on the benefits that come from actively involving workers in their own development.

 

There are simple ways to harness the benefits of employee-driven learning and development. These include giving employees personal ownership of training through suggesting courses or subjects and assisting with the sourcing of learning content. But it may also extend to involving employees in learning KPIs or the development of learning pathways.

 

Russell Donders, Director of International Markets at imc Learning, notes that "we have worked closely with businesses to offer bespoke training and development pathways for a range of industries. Feedback from customers, and our research, is clear: training is a key contributor to employee engagement and business development. Each of us wants to fulfil our potential, and we see huge success in the businesses who understand how to implement that on a personal level.

 

Bespoke training packages, rolled out across all levels of operation, is a simple and effective tool to engage and retain talent. It even feeds into the recruitment process. In fact, 92 percent of job seekers now consider L&D opportunities to be a dealbreaker – so it makes sense this would also feed into engagement for existing talent. Empowering individual-driven learning and development pathways is a simple but effective solution to address changing priorities and reverse, or avoid, quiet quitting."

Quiet quitting can be addressed by employee-led L&D

Employee engagement has become of paramount importance given the challenges around talent scarcity. The trend of quiet quitting highlights the significance that employee satisfaction and fulfilment now play in modern-day workplaces. Businesses that are responsive to that will see real benefit to productivity and talent retention. By embracing employee-driven learning and development, organisations can align themselves with the evolving needs of their employees. The aim is to enhance retention rates and create a positive, growth-centred workplace in which productivity is a natural consequence of the environment.

Looking to implement an employee-led L&D programme?

We'd love to hear how your organisation aims to increase loyalty and engagement through employee-led L&D. Get in touch with us to see how imc can help you best reach your strategic goals.

automotive factory
L&D for the
automotive sector
Modern e-learning for global auto brands

Revolutionising automotive training with modern e-learning

The automotive industry is a rapidly evolving landscape. While new entrants to the market are relatively rare, fierce competition and rapid technological advancements create unique business and training challenges. Companies in this sector must ensure that their workforce is skilled and knowledgeable to stay ahead of the curve.

automotive factory designers

E-learning has emerged as the natural solution to help automotive companies streamline their training processes and gain competitive advantage. Having created automotive training solutions for several market-leading clients, we understand their environment. 

 

Here we explore the advantages that great e-learning can bring to the table.

Unique business and training challenges in the automotive sector

  1. Technological advancements: The automotive industry is witnessing a paradigm shift, with the introduction of electric vehicles (EVs), autonomous driving systems, and connected cars. Global auto brands need to train their employees on new technologies and their applications.
  2. Regulatory compliance: Automotive companies must comply with strict safety and emissions regulations, which often vary across regions. Employees need to be aware of and adhere to these regulations.
  3. Skilled labour shortage: The automotive sector suffers from a skilled labour shortage, and auto companies are quickly upskilling their existing workforce to meet the demands of the market.
  4. High employee turnover: This industry often experiences high employee turnover rates, which means that companies must invest in consistent training for new hires and existing employees.

Why e-learning is the perfect solution for automotive companies

  1. Flexibility and scalability: E-learning platforms allow automotive companies to deliver training modules that learners can access anytime, anywhere. This flexibility ensures that employees can complete their training at their own pace, reducing the impact on their work schedule. Furthermore, L&D managers can easily scale e-learning to accommodate a growing workforce or the introduction of new technologies.
  2. Cost-effectiveness: Traditional training methods are expensive, with costs associated with travel, accommodations, and physical training materials. E-learning platforms significantly reduce these costs, making it a more affordable option for automotive companies.
  3. Personalisation: E-learning platforms can be customised to create personalised learning paths, catering to the individual needs of employees. This ensures that each employee receives training that is relevant to their job role and helps them fill their skill gaps.
  4. Consistency and compliance: E-learning platforms ensure that all employees receive the same training content, promoting consistency across the organisation. Moreover, administrators and training supervisors can quickly update courses to reflect changes in regulations. That way, they keep employees up to date with the latest compliance requirements.
  5. Analytics and performance tracking: The leading e-learning platforms, such as the imc Learning Suite, provide detailed analytics on employee performance. Automotive companies are able to track progress, identify areas that require improvement, and provide targeted support.
  6. Engaging and interactive content: E-learning platforms offer a variety of multimedia content, such as videos and quizzes, making the learning experience more engaging and enjoyable for employees. And easy-to-use e-learning authoring tools like imc Express empower your in-house subject matter experts to create engaging e-learning - without the need for design or technical experience

Automotive e-learning examples

How to get started

E-learning presents automotive companies with a powerful tool to address the unique business and training challenges they face. By leveraging the benefits of e-learning, automotive companies can stay ahead of the curve by continually upskilling their workforce, ensuring regulatory compliance, and fostering a culture of continuous learning. 

 

Create an agile, knowledgeable workforce ready to tackle the challenges of the ever-evolving automotive industry.

 

 

Are you involved in L&D for an automotive company and want to learn more about how the best in modern e-learning can support your training? Get in touch, we'd love to hear from you!

government building
e-Learning for
the public sector
How modern L&D can help government agencies improve public services

Public sector training - e-learning for government agencies

Government agencies, entrusted with serving the public and maximising budgets, must continually adapt to new policies, regulations, and technologies. A well-trained workforce is crucial to ensure that these agencies operate efficiently and effectively. 

 

E-learning can be a powerful tool in helping government agencies overcome training challenges and deliver high-quality services to taxpayers. We've created innovative, impactful solutions for private and public sector training clients across the globe, so we understand the unique challenges faced by government bodies. 

 

Here we look at how great e-learning can help address these challenges.

Unique training challenges in government Agencies

  1. Large and diverse workforce: Government agencies typically employ a large workforce with diverse roles and responsibilities. Consequently, public sector L&D departments can find it a challenge to deliver consistent and relevant training to such a varied audience.
  2. Budgetary constraints: Government agencies often operate within strict budgetary limits, making it difficult for them to invest in comprehensive training programs.
  3. Rapid policy and regulation changes: Government employees need to stay abreast of evolving policies, regulations, and procedures that govern their work. This requires regular and up-to-date training.
  4. Geographical dispersion: Government employees often works across vast geographical areas. Training managers sometimes find it difficult to coordinate and deliver in-person training.
  5. Security and privacy concerns: Government agencies must ensure that their training programmes comply with stringent security and privacy requirements to protect sensitive information.
colleagues discussing LMS

Why e-learning is ideal for public sector training

  1. Cost-effectiveness: E-learning platforms can reduce the costs associated with traditional training methods, such as travel, accommodations, and printed materials. This allows government agencies to maximise their training budgets and reach a larger audience.
  2. Flexibility and scalability: E-learning provides government employees with the flexibility to access training materials anytime, anywhere. This enables employees to learn at their own pace and schedule, leading to higher engagement and completion rates. Additionally, e-learning platforms can be easily scaled to accommodate a growing workforce or the introduction of new policies and regulations.
  3. Personalisation: Customisable e-learning platforms let you deliver personalised learning paths tailored to the specific needs of each employee. This ensures that employees receive training relevant to their job roles and responsibilities, resulting in better performance and higher job satisfaction.
  4. Consistency and compliance: E-learning platforms ensure that all employees receive the same training content, fostering consistency across the organisation. Moreover, training managers can quickly update hem to reflect changes in policies and regulations, ensuring that employees stay current with the latest requirements.
  5. Analytics and performance tracking: The leading e-learning platforms, like our own imc Learning Suite, provide detailed analytics on employee performance, enabling government agencies to monitor progress, identify skill gaps, and provide targeted support.
  6. Enhanced security and privacy: E-learning platforms can be designed with robust security and privacy features to ensure compliance with government regulations and protect sensitive information.

Examples of successful public sector e-learning

How to get started

E-learning presents government agencies with an effective and efficient solution to address the unique training challenges they face. By embracing e-learning, government agencies can empower their workforce with the skills and knowledge needed to deliver high-quality services. 

 

The result is a more agile, well-informed, and efficient public sector.

 

Are you involved in national or local government L&D and want to learn more about how the best in modern e-learning can support your training? Get in touch - we'd love to hear from you!

10 ways to keep corporate learning engaging
Fun & effective
corporate learning
Content and strategies to ditch 'dry' technical training

10 proven ways to keep corporate learning engaging

Rolling out certain types of learning content can sometimes cause L&D or IT managers to cringe. This is especially likely when technical content focuses on dry subject matter or tick-box compliance exercises that aren't always directly related to the learner's role.

it manager cringing

Top 10 tips for HR heads, IT security, and L&D professionals to foster active learning

Technical training topics, such as cybersecurity awareness training or learning a new software system, are often essential for employees to acquire the necessary skills and knowledge to be productive or to comply with legal/regulatory requirements. However, these topics are often considered dry and boring due to complexity, specialised language, or seemingly distant relevance to everyday work life

The 10 ways to keep corporate learning engaging set out below make the learning process more enjoyable and effective.

1. Relate to real-life scenarios

Learners are more likely to engage with technical topics if they can see the direct relevance to their lives or careers. Present real-life scenarios, case studies, or anecdotes that demonstrate how the technical concepts are applied in practice. This will help learners understand the importance of mastering these topics and make the material more relatable.

2. Break down complex concepts

Technical topics can be intimidating due to their complexity. Break down the concepts into smaller, digestible parts, and provide clear explanations and examples for each. Use analogies, metaphors, or comparisons that learners can easily understand to explain difficult concepts. Additionally, create a logical progression of information, building on what learners have already grasped.

3. Use multimedia resources

Leverage various multimedia resources, such as videos, audio recordings, graphics, and animations, to illustrate technical concepts. These resources can help make the material more engaging and accessible, as well as cater to different learning styles. Additionally, incorporating multimedia resources can reinforce key concepts and provide alternative ways for learners to process information.

4. Encourage active learning

Active learning techniques, such as group discussions, problem-solving exercises, and hands-on activities, can make technical training more engaging. By actively participating in the learning process, learners can better internalise and retain the material. Encourage learners to ask questions, share their perspectives, and collaborate on projects to create a more interactive learning environment.

5. Gamify the learning experience

Gamification can make dry technical training topics more enjoyable and motivating. Introduce game elements, such as point systems, leaderboards, and badges, to create a competitive atmosphere and drive engagement. Additionally, design interactive quizzes, puzzles, or simulations that require learners to apply their knowledge in a fun and challenging way.  As an example, we turned one of the driest topics of all - cybersecurity training - into a fun, interactive game - Cyber Crime Time.

imc off the shelf content

In this gamified learning experience, you take the role of a devious hacker. By exploring IT security from the hacker's perspective, learners gain new levels of cybercrime awareness without the process feeling like 'training'. 

 

Try out the game for free to learn about this innovative approach to technical training.

6. Provide immediate feedback

Timely feedback is crucial for learners to understand their progress and identify areas for improvement. Provide immediate feedback during training sessions, either through automated systems or personal interaction. This will help learners adjust their learning strategies and stay motivated.

7. Foster a supportive learning environment

A supportive learning environment can help learners feel comfortable asking questions and discussing technical topics. Encourage open communication and create a culture of mutual respect and understanding. Instructors should be approachable, patient, and willing to provide assistance as needed.

8. Set clear goals and expectations

Learners are more likely to engage with technical training if they understand the goals and expectations. Clearly communicate the learning objectives, expectations, and assessment criteria at the beginning of the training. This will help learners focus on the most important aspects of the material and track their progress.

9. Offer flexibility and customisation

Allow learners to customise their learning experience based on their needs, interests, and learning styles. Offer flexible pacing, optional supplementary materials, and various learning pathways to accommodate individual preferences. This will help learners feel more in control of their learning experience and increase their motivation to engage with the material.

10. Incorporate peer-to-peer knowledge sharing

While some technical training will often need to be formally structured to ensure precision or regulatory compliance, there is often space for informal, peer-to-peer knowledge sharing. 

 

Does your new software system have a 'power user' in the company? Or does one of your team have a way of communicating and sharing knowledge that’s particularly funny or engaging. 

 

Some new e-learning authoring tools, like our own imc Express, are emerging that make it quick and easy to create and share multimedia learning nuggets in as little as 10 minutes. This can enable subject matter experts to become a useful addition to the L&D team - albeit unofficially. It also helps to avoid valuable knowledge and experience to be siloed within departments - or even worse, lost altogether if key personnel were to leave the company.

How to get started

Engaging learners with dry technical training topics may be challenging, but it is achievable if you implement some or all of the above 10 ways to keep corporate learning engaging. By relating the material to real-life scenarios, breaking down complex concepts, using multimedia resources, and fostering active learning, L&D or IT leaders can create a more engaging and effective learning experience for their learners. 

 

With the right approach, even the driest technical topics can become engaging - maybe even fun! 🙂

 

Want to learn more about tools and strategies to make technical training more engaging and effective? Get in touch - we'd love to hear from you!

woman working from home with cats on her desk
Training a hybrid
workforce
Essential strategies for global companies

Training diverse and disparate workforces

Here at imc Learning, we have decades of experience helping customers train hybrid workforces - diverse and disparate learners at global companies. In this post, we cover some of the essential tools and strategies for L&D leaders to consider when training a hybrid workforce. 

 

We also look at how the best e-learning solutions make creating, delivering and analysing your training easier than ever - wherever your employees are based, and whatever language they speak.

Hybrid corporate training

Look back a decade, and early proponents of remote work, such as Basecamp, were seen as unusual - even maverick. Today, post-Covid-19 pandemic, some level of remote or hybrid work is standard for large organisations. 

 

What can vary considerably between large organisations though is the quality of training to hybrid or remote workers and the level to which they are kept engaged and in the loop.

Checklist for training hybrid/remote workers

Many of the points here might seem obvious, but whether you are an experienced L&D leader or relatively new to training remote teams, it can be easy to see certain elements of employee engagement as a given and forget to carry them out. Unfortunately, out of sight can really be out of mind all too often, and this can lead to a feeling of isolation and disengagement among remote workers. 

 

Below is a checklist to help you ensure you don’t miss out any of the steps needed to create a comprehensive training programme for your hybrid workforce

Assess your training needs

Before you can create a training program, you need to understand your unique needs. Consider the following to train your hybrid workforce:

  1. Job roles: Identify the skills and knowledge required for each job role.
  2. Skill gaps: Determine the skills that need improvement or development.
  3. Technical requirements: Evaluate the tools and technology needed to support remote and onsite employees.

Set clear objectives and goals

Establish specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound (SMART) objectives for your training program. These objectives should align with your company's overall goals and focus on addressing the skill gaps identified earlier.

Choose the right training formats

To accommodate both remote and onsite employees, consider using a mix of training formats, such as:

 

  1. E-learning: Offer self-paced online courses and tutorials.
  2. Webinars: Conduct live or pre-recorded sessions for real-time interaction.
  3. Instructor-led training: Provide in-person or virtual classes led by experienced trainers.
  4. Blended learning: Combine multiple training formats for a more comprehensive learning experience.

Develop engaging training content

Create high-quality, engaging training content that caters to different learning styles. Ensure your materials are up-to-date and relevant to your employees' roles. Consider incorporating interactive elements like quizzes and gamification to boost engagement.

Leverage e-learning technology

Use various technology tools to support your training program, such as:

 

  1. Learning management systems (LMS): Use an LMS to organise, distribute, and track training progress. The imc Learning Suite integrates with many other HR and business software applications, and offers powerful training delivery and learner analytics tools. 
  2. Video conferencing: Integrate video conferencing tools, such as Zoom, Google Meet or Microsoft Teams to facilitate virtual instructor-led training and webinars.
  3. Collaboration tools: Encourage teamwork and collaboration among remote and onsite employees through platforms like Slack or Microsoft Teams.

Implement a support system

Offer continuous support to your employees during and after the training. This may include:
  1. Mentorship programmes: Pair employees with experienced team members for guidance and support.
  2. Online forums: Create a space where employees can ask questions and share knowledge.
  3. Regular check-ins: Schedule periodic check-ins with employees to monitor progress and address any concerns.
  4. Peer-to-peer knowledge sharing. imc Express is an e-learning authoring tool that makes it easy for your subject matter experts to create and share engaging learning modules in as little as 10 minutes, with no design or coding expertise needed. 
It now also incorporates ChatGPT technology from OpenAI, enabling content to be translated into any of 50+ languages at the click of a button.

Evaluate and recalibrate your training programme

Regularly assess the effectiveness of your training programme by gathering feedback from employees and analysing performance metrics. Use this information to make any necessary adjustments to your training content, format, or delivery methods. 

How to get started

Learning how to train a hybrid workforce requires a thoughtful and flexible approach. Often you will need to accommodate the needs of both remote and onsite employees. By following this checklist and leveraging the latest tech, you'll be able to create a comprehensive and effective training programme that supports the success of your entire workforce.

 

Would you like to discuss how our suite of e-learning solutions can support your hybrid workforce? Get in touch - we'd love to hear from you!

retail worker using digital tablet
Transformative
training for retail
Find out more about learning & development (L&D) challenges in the retail sector

Transforming retail training
with e-learning

The retail sector is a dynamic and rapidly changing environment. Advancing technologies, intense competition, and evolving consumer demands, all drive transformation. Training employees to stay ahead of these changes is critical to the success of any retailer.

 

For decades, we’ve helped some of the world’s biggest brands to maximise their retail training ROI. Here we look at the unique challenges faced by the retail sector and how great e-learning can help overcome these challenges. 

Unique training challenges in the retail sector

  1. High employee turnover: The retail sector is notorious for high employee turnover rates. The average retail employee turnover is 60.5% in the US and 57.3% in the UK. This makes it essential for retailers to invest in training for new hires, but also to engage and retain your best existing employees.

  2. Seasonal workforce: Retailers often employ a large number of temporary or seasonal workers, who require quick and efficient training to perform their roles effectively.

  3. Diverse workforce: Retail employees come from various backgrounds and possess varying levels of skills and experience, making it challenging to develop and deliver consistent training that feels relevant to your learners.

  4. Dispersed workforce: Retail companies often operate across multiple locations, making it difficult to coordinate and deliver in-person training.

  5. Rapid technological advancements: The integration of new technologies, such as e-commerce, mobile payments, and inventory management systems, requires retailers to continually upskill their workforce.
retail workers

Why e-learning is great for retailers

  1. Cost-Effectiveness: E-learning platforms can significantly reduce the costs associated with traditional training methods, such as travel, accommodation, and printed materials. This allows retailers to maximise their training budgets and allocate resources more effectively.
  2. Flexibility and Scalability: E-learning provides retail employees with the flexibility to access training materials anytime, anywhere. This enables employees to learn at their own pace and schedule, leading to higher engagement and completion rates. Furthermore, robust e-learning platforms can be easily scaled to accommodate a growing workforce or the introduction of new technologies.
  3. Personalisation: E-learning platforms can be customised to create personalised learning paths, catering to the individual needs of retail employees. This ensures that each employee receives training that is relevant to their job role and helps them fill their skill gaps. Such learning personalisation can help employees to feel valued and increase staff retention levels. 
  4. Consistency and Compliance: E-learning platforms ensure that all employees receive the same training content, promoting consistency across the organisation. Moreover, they can be updated quickly to reflect changes in regulations or company policies, keeping employees up-to-date with the latest requirements.
  5. Analytics and Performance Tracking: The best e-learning platforms, such as the imc Learning Suite, provide detailed analytics on employee performance, enabling retailers to track progress, identify areas that require improvement, and provide targeted support.
  6. Engaging and Interactive Content: E-learning platforms offer a variety of multimedia content, such as videos, quizzes, and simulations, making the learning experience more engaging and enjoyable for retail employees. Easy to use e-learning authoring tools like imc Express can allow your own subject matter experts to create engaging e-learning as and when needed to share with colleagues - without the need for design or technical experience.

Retail e-learning examples

How to get started

E-learning presents retailers with a powerful tool to address the unique training challenges they face, such as fast-changing product lines and high employee turnover. By leveraging the benefits of modern e-learning, retailers can continually upskill their workforce, ensure training consistency, and foster a culture of continuous learning. 

 

The result is an engaged, skilled, knowledgeable workforce that’s ready to tackle the challenges of a competitive retail landscape.

 

Are you involved in retail L&D and want to learn more about how the best in modern e-learning can support your training? Get in touch - we'd love to hear from you!

team celebrates victory
The Future of the Commonwealth Games' LMS
Customer Case Study

The Future of the Commonwealth Games Digital Learning Platform

Welcome to the seventh and final post in our series exploring imc’s project with Birmingham 2022 Commonwealth Games. We will wrap up by revealing the Commonwealth Games organising committee’s plans for their imc LMS at future games, including lessons learned and the benefits of their multi-game contract.

Following the final day of the Birmingham 2022 Commonwealth Games in early August 2022, the team for the Birmingham games will be disbanded. However, the story doesn’t end there. Beyond 2022, imc’s sports event LMS will be used for the 2026 and 2030 games, sticking with the sustainability theme running through the Commonwealth Games, meaning that the Commonwealth Games organising committee can build on the success of this year’s solution without having to start from scratch.

team thinking about the next move

A sustainable LMS for future Commonwealth Games

The Commonwealth Games takes place every four years in a different part of the Commonwealth. The regular recurrence of these events makes it a perfect setup for the multi-game contract the Commonwealth Games has with imc. This means that rather than creating a brand-new LMS every four years, they will reuse as much as possible from the Birmingham 2022 Commonwealth Games.

 

In 2026, the Commonwealth Games will be held in Victoria, Australia, and the imc LMS will be passed to their team. This will make the job of the Victoria 2026 Commonwealth Games team significantly easier, as they won’t need to procure and build a new LMS, and they can learn from the Birmingham 2022 team to make the LMS as successful as possible.

soccer team scored

Lessons learned

The Birmingham 2022 Commonwealth Games team had a relatively short amount of time to create a scalable LMS to support tens of thousands of users, so their timeframe will help the Victoria 2026 team establish how far in advance they should start working on the LMS. The plan for the first iteration of the Commonwealth Games LMS was to start small, with a view to making improvements with each games as needs changed.

 

Another piece of advice from the Birmingham 2022 team is to fully integrate the LMS with the workforce management system. The Birmingham 2022 LMS, B-Bright, communicates with Rosterfy, the workforce management system, but owing to the tight turnaround, it was not fully integrated. A benefit of the multi-game contract is that the Birmingham 2022 team can easily hand this knowledge over to the new Victoria 2026 team, which would not be possible under a traditional single-contract setup.

Sport team are supporting each other

Reimagining the LMS for future Commonwealth Games

imc’s LMS will be particularly useful for Victoria 2026, because the games will be held across four regional sites (Geelong, Bendigo, Ballarat and Gippsland) in the state. The LMS will make it significantly easier to deliver training to volunteers, contractors and employees across the state, and the fact that the platform was built with flexibility and scalability at its core means that it can cater to any audience size at the next games.

 

The host of the 2030 games has not yet been decided, but this team will also benefit from the lessons learned from Birmingham 2022 and Victoria 2026. The mult-game contract means that imc will have full oversight of the ongoing project, and the Commonwealth Games won’t have to explain their requirements over and over again to new vendors.

 

Moreover, each Commonwealth Games has its own branding and approach to training volunteers. With their imc LMS, each future learning team will have the power to apply their own branding to the LMS, reconfigure anything they need and also keep anything they like from previous iterations.

 

The Commonwealth Games has chosen a sustainable, cost-effective and efficient approach to LMS procurement and development, and imc is proud to be their learning partner for many years to come.

More information

We hope you have enjoyed our deep dive into imc’s LMS for the Birmingham 2022 Commonwealth Games! Want to find out more? Get in touch today to discover how we can help you create a sustainable LMS to support your learning efforts long into the future.

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E-Learning Punk
Learning Campaigns

When an Awareness Week Is Not Enough – Engaged Learning Through Learning Campaigns

Using learning campaign portals to create immersive learning campaigns

Some things just can’t be learned in an hour. Or even a week. Things like organisational change management – where attention needs to be focused on a specific topic over a prolonged period. In these cases, sustained learning is key.

 

It’s a little bit like classic advertising. Coca-Cola’s annual advertising presence, for example, doesn’t hinge on a single one-week TV spot campaign. Instead, the company draws attention to its products over a sustained period using a strong, well-coordinated multi-channel campaign. It’s all carefully designed to ensure consumers reach for the red can the next time they open the chiller.

 

In the same way, a good learning campaign should bring about a mind shift – ideally one that leads to concrete action. Sounds good, but how exactly? The answer is portals. They can provide a highly effective entry point to learning campaigns. In this article, we outline the structure and use of learning campaign portals.

punk learning campaign portals breaker

Immersive user interfaces for specific topics

With organisation-wide learning and development (L&D) campaigns, the idea is to reach as many employees as possible. And for that, the content must be both learner-centric and accessible without any time or location constraints. Most importantly, it must boost learning motivation and generate successful, lasting learning outcomes.

 

These objectives can be achieved by using a learning campaign portal. Learning campaign portals are add-ons for learning management systems. They facilitate orientation in complex learning campaigns, providing learning environments that are so immersive, learners don’t even realise they’re learning.

imc-e-learning-punk-learning-campaign-portals-06

These interactive learning environments are custom developed for each client and brand. Learners can make their own way through the navigation structure and access different items of learning content through jump labels. The result is a digital journey of discovery that is almost limitless in scope. Chatbots, avatars, and dynamic environmental and special-effect sounds can be integrated to reinforce sustained learning effectiveness. Similarly, gamification elements can be added to further enhance learner motivation.

Some applications of learning campaign portals

  • Change campaigns: Change campaigns are a way of making lasting change to employee mindsets and corporate culture. The objective is to boost acceptance through learning. That way, employees are more amenable to the proposed changes and more willing to contribute to their success.

 

  • Events: Many organisations use action days to raise employee awareness of certain issues and communicate the organisation’s position on those issues.

 

  • Onboarding and upskilling: Effective onboarding gets new employees off to a good start with the company. It also creates a sense of belonging and instils an understanding of the company’s values and culture.

 

  • Comprehensive learning journeys: Learning journeys put the learner first and offer different learning formats for different topics and learning objectives.
imc-e-learning-punk-learning-campaign-portals-04

Gaming meets navigation system

The heart of a learning campaign portal is a 2D or 3D map. Alongside its orientation function, the map draws the learner into a fun, game-like journey of discovery. This gamification element is designed to appeal to the young and youthful. However, a good learning campaign portal will be readily accessible for learners of all backgrounds thanks to its intuitive navigation system and quality orientation features.

 

Example: A company wants to run a six-month sustainability and environmental campaign. The aim is to explain the company’s own position, raise employee awareness, and bring about a mind shift. In this example, the company could integrate a portal upstream of its LMS that guides employees through all learning content relevant to environmental protection.

 

There are no design limits to how this might be achieved. In the above example, the map through which learners journey could be a rainforest or ocean, for instance. Or perhaps the company wants to present a future vision of its own site or visualise the campaign by means of a custom campus. This level of creative freedom calls for good sparring partners who, for all their love of the product, are always mindful of functionality. This is where our experts come in. They provide comprehensive advice on all aspects and put successful learning front and centre.

imc navigation map

The facts:

  • Learning campaign portals are not ad hoc solutions – they require a planning and development phase.
  • The scope of learning campaigns should be limited either to specific content or specific timeframes.
  • A learning campaign portal is not a stand-alone product – it requires a learning system (LMS).
  • Independent exploration of a map will enhance motivation.
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I joined the imc newsroom team in 2021. As a journalist my heart beats for content and storytelling.

 

I’m excited to figure out how e-learing and digitization affect the future of work. My task is to create content to talk about and I’m always looking for trends.

 

Privately I love to travel and eat Tapas.

 

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Nina Wamsbach
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Moving Beyond Learning Paths

Development Paths: Moving Beyond Learning Paths

Learning paths have been part of corporate learning for a while, but they’re not being used to their full potential. Learning paths offer more than just a way of providing short-term training for employees. They can be an absolute game changer in the fight to overcome skills shortages.

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Greater potential than you might think: Learning paths in LMS

Used correctly, with proper planning and linked to job profiles, learning paths can be a valuable tool for long-term, targeted employee development. Some companies are already aware of the value of learning paths in their bid to overcome skills shortages. They systematically foster lifelong learning and are using them to good effect through their learning management systems (LMS).

 

This is possible because learning paths are core parts of commonly used learning platforms. Put simply, learning paths are used to map long-term training and professional development plans that span multiple courses. These courses can consist of a very wide range of learning content types, including online courses, face-to-face training, and even periods of blended learning. And often there are dependencies between the individual courses: the learner can’t book Course B until they have successfully completed Course A or met some other prerequisites.

Learning sequence and dependencies within learning paths

Applying these sorts of rules regarding the logical order of learning steps gives rise to various learning concepts. For example, you can create open learning concepts with freely selectable module sequences so the learner can choose the order in which they progress through the modules. Alternatively, you can create closed scenarios in which the sequencing of modules is fixed.

 

Moreover – and this is where it gets interesting – you can set up these scenarios either as content-based or level-based learning paths. Interesting because this is the point where learning paths become true development paths.

Leveraging content-based learning paths for more structure and better learning experiences

Content-based learning paths are the classic solution and are found in most learning platforms. You can use them to provide and track structured learning content over longer time frames. Take, for example, a six-month onboarding programme in which the participants are required to complete a series of diverse courses.

 

In case a new hire is assigned to a certain group – say, Sales – in the LMS, they can automatically be signed up for the onboarding programme for that group (in this case “Sales”).

learning path LMS imc learning suite

Depending on how the learning path is configured, the new employee is then required to take a test. Depending on the results, they are either allowed to proceed directly to certain modules or required to complete the entire learning path. The learner can in most cases work through the modules in any order they like and can book things like face-to-face training themselves.

 

In many cases, successful completion of the learning path is conditional on taking a test or passing an assessment interview. Once the learning path has been successfully completed, our learner automatically receives a certificate, which is automatically stored in the system.

 

Learning paths of this type are a relatively simple way of structuring learning content or courses and are standard in commonly used learning management systems.

Level-based learning paths and recertification

Level-based learning paths resemble content-based ones at first glance but are more sophisticated and offer a lot more options. They consist of three levels, each building on the previous one, and are directly linked to the learner’s skill and role profiles.

Tobias Sommer, imc

This opens up a wealth of applications, as imc business consultant Tobias Sommer explains: “Daimler Global Training, with whom we co-created learning paths of this type, uses them in various scenarios, such as helping employees to meet the requirements of certain job profiles.

 

Other clients use level-based learning paths for recertification. Recertification means that an employee must regularly complete prescribed professional development courses within the learning path in order to maintain their status as a specialist in a certain area.

If the employee does not complete the level by the specified deadline, they lose their specialist status. But if they do complete it, they can use that as proof that they have undertaken the latest training – for a particular software, for example. In this way, Daimler is actively integrating lifelong learning into the everyday routines of its employees while at the same time undertaking ongoing quality assurance.”

learning path LMS

Direct integration of certificates and new jobs

Other options for getting the most out of level-based learning paths include using them in conjunction with job advertisements, certificates, and clearances to access certain documents. In other words, certain prerequisites and access restrictions can be tied to pre-defined levels.

 

Take, for example, a learner who is in learning path two of three. Before the learner can graduate from their current learning path and hence gain access to sensitive documents, their supervisor must confirm in the system that they have acquired all the necessary knowledge. Only then, and after passing a final test, will the learner be authorised to access the documents in question. You can also take the same approach with job profiles: employees are blocked from seeing certain job advertisements until they have acquired the skills needed for the job in question.

 

Then there’s the certificate use case, as Sommer explains: “The system can also be set up to generate certificates automatically so that, on completion of learning requirements, learners automatically receive certificates which are then also automatically stored in their profiles. This saves time by eliminating manual up- and downloads and HR involvement. Learners can receive certificates on completion of the entire learning path or, in the case of level-based learning paths, on completion of each level as well.”

learning path graphic

Using development paths instead of learning paths: What’s the benefit?

As we have seen, the potential of learning paths is immense. Tobias Sommer: “Used consistently, level-based learning paths are more like development paths that can be used to take professional development – or even the push to fill skills shortages – to a whole new level.

 

If I know exactly what qualifications my employees have and consistently provide professional development, I will have the agility, for example, to rapidly fill positions from within the company. I can simply look up which employees might be suitable based on their qualifications and save myself any unnecessary searching.

And that’s why I think this function still has enormous potential, and why I’d like to see more companies recognising that and taking advantage of it.”

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If you would like to learn more about imc's Learning Management, check here for more information.

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I have been working in the Marketing & Communication Team at imc since March 2019.

Communication, creative content and social media are my passion. "KISS - Keep it short and simple" is my credo.

 

To explain complex content in an understandable way and thus make the topic of e-Learning accessible to everyone is an exciting challenge every day.

 

Privately I love to read, play poker and travel a lot.

I am always happy to receive feedback or suggestions.

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Nadine Kreutz
Communication Manager
How to create
an LMS RfP

Compiling an LMS requirements for proposal (RfP)

Are you looking to compile an LMS RfP requirements document to help choose the best training solution for your organisation’s needs?

With hundreds of learning management systems (LMS) on the market today, deciding which one is right for you can be a complicated process. A good Request for Proposal (RfP) can simplify your decision making process by starting off with a training needs and features checklist.

 

Your choices can then be whittled down to a shortlist of LMS solutions that meet your specific criteria, with a final decision based on which provider you most like and trust.

 

What's an RfP for learning management systems?

A request for proposal or RfP is a document put together by the client and sent to potential learning management system providers in order to start the conversation about suitability and generating a quote.

 

A good RfP will contain information about the organisation and its elearning goals, the number of people (sometimes including external partners and supply chain as well as employees) to be trained, existing technology infrastructure to be integrated into, and any other LMS needs and constraints.

 

LMS providers who feel they can meet these criteria can then send a proposal, and the client can form a shortlist of providers to progress conversations with, and from whom to make a final choice.

Benefits of an LMS request for proposal

One of the key benefits of an LMS request for proposal is that it ensures a level of objectivity in the procurement process. By starting with a checklist of essential, then nice to have features, the client can be more assured of suitability in a learning platform, rather than being overly swayed by slick sales presentations.

 

Before talking to a vendor, you can define your essential LMS requirements, before going on to list those that would be a bonus but that you may be willing to forego depending on price or strengths in your must-have criteria.

 

It’s really important to identify which criteria are truly essential to making an LMS work for your organisation, regardless of bells and whistles in nice to have areas. These LMS priorities will help to ensure the project does not fail.

 

Timescales and budgets

Does your project have a strict timescale and / or budget? If you have hard limits to work within, by making these clear within your RfP you can avoid any time-wasting discussions if a vendor simply can not meet them. It also prevents time and budget creep once a project is underway.

 

Because the RfP is an up-front piece of work that can be sent to multiple vendors (and there really are hundreds to choose from), you will usually save time overall because you are not having to repeat yourself in initial email and telephone conversations. You can also avoid conversations with and presentations from companies that can not meet your needs.

LMS RfP components

Your document should have 3 broad RfP components, which are:

 

  • Project overview
  • LMS requirements
  • Vendor expectations

 

Let’s go into each of these sections in some more detail:

Project overview

This should be a brief (one page should suffice) intro to your project and touch on what you are looking for and why.

 

What is your current training solution and what is it you’re looking to add / change / improve?

 

It should include the name and contact information for your project lead so that the vendor can ask any follow-up questions.

 

It should also include a deadline for the project so that vendors who can not work to your timescale can quickly self-eliminate. Include your timeline for receiving proposals and making a final decision on your vendor.

 

While you don’t need to go into detail on your company history, its founders etc (by all means link to this background info online), helpful information will include your company’s industry, regulatory environment, number of employees to be trained now and down the line, and geography - especially important if there’s likely to be a multilingual component.

 

LMS requirements

This is where you get into the detail of what you need from a new LMS and can be much longer than the project overview if you have put together a good list of requirements having had consultations across all your stakeholder groups.

Users

This will be much more numbers-based and touch on:

 

  • Learner roles and numbers within each type - on launch and for subsequent roll-outs
  • Geographies and languages
  • Number of courses
  • Existing and desired training media
  • Administrator roles and any relevant hierarchies (an organisational chart may help)
  • Potential numbers of concurrent users

 

LMS features

If you are relatively new to LMS features or you are replacing a very outdated system, you may be fuzzy on potential functionalities within the ideal platform, especially when it comes to terminology.

 

Feel free to talk here about what you need to achieve with the learning platform if you’re not sure how to define the feature that would make it happen.

Common LMS needs and functions

 

  • Creation of job roles and competencies defined in each position
  • Enrolment process on courses, including any combination of self-enrolment, automated enrolment by role or manual enrolment governed by managers
  • Multi-tenancy - i.e. creation of tailored, and even branded, learning environments for different teams, including employee types, external partners and even customers
  • Assessments and certificates - including quizzes, required competency levels and any legal / regulatory compliance needs
  • Reporting tools for administrators and departments such as HR and Legal
  • Mobile access - especially important if you have employees on the go who need to access training materials via a tablet or smartphone.
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LMS Integrations

It’s rare that large organisations will want a learning platform that operates in isolation these days. LMS integrations with existing HR software such as Workday or SAP, a CRM like Salesforce, and other tools managing employee data can save a great deal of time spent on learner admin.

 

It can also improve overall business performance by increasing knowledge sharing across your organisation. Define your existing people software where integration could make life easier.

Vendor expectations

Define what you would like to receive back from the vendor. Any experienced LMS provider will have existing templates that they work with and which are often pre-populated to an extent, but you can still request information in a format that suits you.

 

You may want to request an initial one-page summary of their solution that encapsulates what they can deliver and when, and to what budget. This will make it easier to discuss proposals with your peers and other stakeholders without having to go into the fine detail.

 

As an LMS buyer, very important information to receive from the vendor includes:

Their company and background

  • How long have they been in business? You don’t want to be a guinea pig or deal with an inexperienced team
  • How large is their team of LMS developers? While you don’t necessarily need to work with the largest companies and all the overhead costs that come with that, you don’t want the risk of single points of failure that come with working with a small business
  • Who are their customers? Do they have experience in your sector and with your company size? If so, this will fast forward their understanding of your needs.

 

The platform

  • Have they ticked all the essential requirements? Don’t let ticking lots of boxes across the must-haves and nice-to-haves cloud your judgement here. A high overall ‘score’ is meaningless if one or to absolute musts are not met - this system just won’t work for you.
  • What is the position on data security? Does it meet any specific needs for your industry?
  • Technical environment - can it work with your IT set-up?

Budget

  • Is the system scalable without additional costs per learner or is it priced per learner? The latter benefits smaller organisations but can become painful for larger ones…
  • Is there a separate implementation cost?
  • How does ongoing support work and how is it priced?
  • Are there update / renewal fees and when are they payable?
  • Is user training included or charged separately?

 

Implementation plan

  • Do you start with a limited cohort of learners for user testing?
  • What are the various implementation stages and timescales for each?
  • What involvement is required from the LMS buyer and at what stages?

Summary

Buying an LMS can be a complicated process - especially when you need to factor in your possible future training needs in addition to your immediate requirements.

 

By putting together a detailed LMS RfP, you can help to ensure that your procurement will be objective and evidence-based, helping you to avoid costly mistakes and disappointment.

 

Separate genuine must-haves from nice-to-have features, and you can ensure you meet the needs of all your stakeholders, and that any additional features simply make the new platform more enjoyable and more useful for your business as a whole.

 

As imc Learning has decades of experience delivering on the training needs of some of the world’s best-known brands, if you’d like to have a conversation about your own elearning project, feel free to contact us for an informal chat.

 

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