imc Compliance
Blog Article
Topic: Compliance Training

Don’t call it compliance!

5 success factors for effective realisation of
"boring" trainings

Spontaneous yawning, irritated eye-rolling and sudden appearance of urgent appointments are some of the most common side effects of announcing the latest compliance training. Yet, it is crucial that employees internalise the learned content from important training courses on topics such as data protection or fraud prevention for the long term. This can only be achieved if the learning experience is great. We reveal how that can be done.

“It really is very simple: The more complex and dry a topic, the better the experience needs to be for the learner,” Sven R. Becker, learning expert and Member of the imc Executive Board sums up. As much as the learning experience is hyped up and features in the learning management system (LMS), it often falls by the wayside in company-specific training.

Topics like the latest GDPR provisions or IDD training as soon required in the insurance sector might not be met with great enthusiasm – but they are extremely important. Employees not only need to understand these topics, they must also internalise them and apply them in their daily work.

Creative realisation of dry topics like fraud prevention

Audi is leading by example. The automobile giant ventured to try a courageous concept: Web-based training modelled on “Sin City” is leveraged to train all employees in fraud prevention. Right from the outset, it is obvious that this training course is different. Usually, a participant would click “Start training now” to make a start on their training course. Here, they are greeted with the following text: “Welcome to Fraud City. The city “eats” its residents – skin, hair and all. We hope you’re up to it. Enter at your own risk.”

Throughout the course, the participant accompanies Detective Fraudless who investigates fraud cases. In this game setting, the participants become familiar with the criteria used to identify cases of fraud while also becoming sensitive to suspicious behavioural patterns.

case study compliance training customer reference audi ag

Laura Schumacher, Training Officer at Audi, emphasises: “We very deliberately wanted to provide a different kind of training course that is fun and sticks with you, especially for this sensitive topic.”
This unusual concept is paying off: On the intranet, countless Audi employees made largely positive remarks on “Fraud City” – rather remarkable for compliance training.

Standard training for ever-changing guidelines

Since not everyone can justify the time and expense of highly customised training courses, a large selection of off-the-shelf content (OTS) is also available. In particular, this is a suitable solution for contents or certifications requiring adaptation due to regular updates, legislative changes or new guidelines.

Such off-the-shelf training courses fit the bill for product training required in the insurance, banking, pharmaceutical or medical sectors. It is, however, important that providers hold relevant certificates and accreditations and are able to guarantee automated learning content updates.

TIP

Ensure that your provider is an accredited educational service provider and guarantees that content is always up to date.

These standard training courses can easily be mapped in the LMS and facilitate complete documentation and certification of all employees. Vivian Porath is responsible for OTS contents at imc. She is confident that these training courses need not be boring at all:

We have received outstanding feedback from our clients, especially on our standard data protection training. Our clients feel the design hits the spot, being neither too comical nor too serious.

One reviewer stated that they thought the training course achieved a perfect technical balance. Other courses they attended had been either too superficial or looked at the subject in such depth that they had switched off. We were thrilled to hear that. After all, we strive to present the GDPR in such a way that anyone can gain from it. Many employees have no need to dive deep into the subject matter. Rather, they must be sensitised to the topic in general.”

Vivien Porath, imc

Vivien Porath

It still holds true: Employee motivation and a great learning experience are key. Without them, learned content is forgotten faster than you can close the next cookie banner.

DS-GVO training imc

LMS integration

Training alone is not enough – whether based on customised or standard content. Traceability must also be ensured. This is best done with a suitable LMS that allows admins to allocate relevant training courses to each target group, and should also include setting end points and establishing escalation management.

 

Say, for example, insurance expert Ms Smith belongs to a group of employees who must earn a specific number of IDD points . The administrator can create an automated alert for relevant courses in the system. If she fails to complete the training by a certain date, she will receive repeated email reminders. At a pre-defined date, her direct supervisor can also be informed.

INFO

Since 2018, all insurance intermediaries throughout Europe have been obliged to undergo further training within the framework of the Insurance Distribution Directive (IDD). The number of obligatory training hours varies from country to country.

What to base your choice on

What should clients pay attention to when buying compliance training? Sven R. Becker summarises:

 

1. First of all, understand your target group. Does the target group need to acquire in-depth specialist knowledge? Or is sensitisation the primary goal? Your answer to this question must be reflected in the technical presentation.

 

2. It is generally advisable to establish a basic understanding for sensitive topics across the entire organisation, a compliance mindset. Each training course and each measure must be positioned within this mindset. It is crucial that management is setting an example. Integrating senior management into the training course is often helpful, and asking them to design realistic case studies can help learners see how the content applies to them.

 

3. Standard training is better suited to content more general in nature, as the provider must ensure that it is up to date. However, if a topic is specific to a sector or even just the company, it helps to customise at least parts of the training and only filling the gaps with standard content.

 

4. Ask yourself for how long you want to use a training course. If contents requires frequent adaptation, OTS content is often a better choice – provided that certifications and updates are guaranteed.

 

5. Don’t call it compliance training! The term alone is like a red flag for many employees. It pays to be brave and find a different name. Surprise your learners with training courses that polarise and stand out. This makes your contents more memorable than with run-of-the-mill courses. And maybe you can even have your employees enjoy the training – without the yawns.

Further information

If you would like to learn more about off-the-shelf content or our custom content, please check the related pages and feel free to contact us.

You can also check this webinar recording (German only) about the topic of compliance.

YOUR CONTACT

Contact

I have been working in the Marketing & Communication Team at imc since March 2019.

Communication, creative content and social media are my passion. "KISS - Keep it short and simple" is my credo.

 

To explain complex content in an understandable way and thus make the topic of e-Learning accessible to everyone is an exciting challenge every day.

 

Privately I love to read, play poker and travel a lot.

I am always happy to receive feedback or suggestions.

Photo of Nadine Kreutz
Nadine Kreutz
Communication Manager
E-Learning Punk Talk Dr. Fabian Kempf
E-Learning Punk

Punky Talk #4: Dr. Fabian Kempf

The specialist for virtual classrooms firmly believes: “Poorly modelled 3D avatars are not helpful in the virtual world.”

Our fourth Punky Talk is fully dedicated to the topic of virtual classrooms. After all, digital lessons are the best answer to the corona pandemic and the associated prohibition of contact in many places.

 

The article “Rock 'n' roll in the (virtual) classroom” already examined in detail what a virtual classroom is and how it works. It then goes on to present three providers of virtual classroom tools. Vitero is one of these providers. The highlight of the Vitero software is its user interface. It depicts a meeting room of sorts which is based on the real world and arranges lesson participants around a conference table. Nevertheless, Managing Director Dr. Fabian Kempf firmly believes that poorly modelled 3D avatars are not helpful in the virtual world. In this interview, he shares his tips for adding opulence and glamour to the virtual classroom instead.

 

Enjoy watching!

IN A NUTSHELL

Summary of key points from the interview

  • Virtual classrooms can help companies through the difficult corona period, and even save them from bankruptcy.
  • Since speed is paramount, Vitero had to adapt its processes and launched a quick-start offer specifically tailored to the current situation.
  • The crucial element for developing a close teacher-student relationship is regular exchange, rather than physical proximity.
  • Trainers should therefore focus on interaction and collaboration to strengthen the relationship.
  • Good training allows a trainer in the virtual room to respond to common complaints like “I cannot hear you” with confidence, and design interactive lessons that generate discussion.
  • LMS and virtual classrooms are a perfect match. A learning management system with web-based training achieves independence in terms of time, inclusion of a larger target group and longer applicability – the half-life of contents. A virtual classroom removes the need for elaborate content creation. Moreover, live communication means that any comprehension issues can be addressed directly. Combining the two tools creates synergies between their benefits and provides optimal support for the realisation of blended learning concepts.
  • Incorrectly modelled 3D avatars are rather difficult to navigate in the virtual room. A more effective approach is to limit 3D content illustration to specific points where this boosts visualisation.
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Find out how virtual instructions work, what you should pay special attention to and which providers offer virtual classrooms software.

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E-Learning Punk is an article and talk series for all L&D Pros who want to dare something and believe that digital training has to be colourful and loud.

Contact person

Since 2014 I have been part of the marketing and communication team at imc. My heart beats for creative campaigns, exciting content and digital innovations. My goal is to make digital topics understandable and simple to the point. My passions besides my job are good books and sports.
I am always happy to receive feedback on the series at vanessa.klein@im-c.com.
Photo of Vanessa Klein
Vanessa Klein
Senior Event and Communication Manager
SoftSkills imc
InnoLabs
Project: DEVELOP

Re-thinking career development: training soft skills with serious games

Communication and leadership skills are more important than ever, not only in times of virtual teamwork. But how do you train these so-called transversal skills? How can learning progress be identified and recommendations be made for further skill development?

European research partners in the DEVELOP project have been specifically working on these questions and they are now presenting innovative solutions. A résumé and an outlook.

innolabs Develop

To create a learning environment in which soft skills can be measured and improved, and in which at the same time recommendations for individual career development are provided: this was the aim of the EU-funded research project DEVELOP. Coordinated by the Trinity College, Dublin, eight European research institutions and companies worked on this project for three years, with funding ending in October 2019.

The imc AG mainly supported the development of the Social Learning Tool, which enables employees to train soft skills such as leadership or communication in their daily work by means of small practical tasks and to reflect on their experiences in a community of practice. This tool can also be used as interactive course content in the imc Learning Suite, imc’s Learning Management System.

Individual Career Planning

The DEVELOP project has developed a Personalised Learning Environment (PLE) that benefits strategic human resources development and that supports both employees and managers in medium-sized and large companies. As an online career coach, the system offers users tailor-made guidance to actively plan and develop their career. Special attention is paid to the promotion of soft and transversal skills.

Promotion of soft skills

Traditionally, soft and transversal skills, such as communication skills or leadership qualities, are evaluated through Assessment Centers lasting several days. However, this is time-consuming and cost-intensive and therefore not always possible.

Uta Schwertel, imc's project manager, adds: "In today's world, it is not only a question of pure specialist knowledge, but employees and managers must be able to transfer their knowledge and apply it in a flexible way.”

 

Therefore, the research partners at DEVELOP broke new ground and developed digital soft skills assessment tools and integrated them into their learning environment, the PLE.

In addition to tools such as personality tests or 360° feedback, game-based methods for the assessment and training of soft skills such as leadership were successfully developed.

Uta Schwertel

Dr. Uta Schwertel

In the games, you immerse yourself in authentic situations of everyday work and interact with virtual team members. The Social Learning Tool also incorporates communities of practice, in which selected soft skills such as "Agile Leadership" or "Negotiation" can be consolidated and reflected upon with others through targeted practical exercises in everyday working life.

Serious Games instead of Assessment Center

In practice, the scenario is as follows: At the beginning of the digital soft skills assessment, you start with a self-evaluation and get feedback from colleagues and superiors, which is also reflected in the system. Then you can complete various serious games, which, for example, assess your communication skills or, by means of a simulation, your abilities as a manager.

 

From all these assessments, the system determines the employee's current competency profile and provides corresponding automated recommendations and options for possible career paths and career goals. The employee can choose the desired path and receives suitable training recommendations to close competency gaps. As soon as a training is completed, the plan is updated, and the corresponding progress is visible in the system.

Innolabs DEVELOP

Practical training for direct application

Uta Schwertel explains what were the biggest challenges during the project: "Especially with leadership skills, it is always very difficult to integrate the skills learned during a one-time training course into everyday working life. That's why we decided to use a tool that works like a social network and aims to support informal learning and on-the-job training when dealing with issues".

 

So, if an employee wants to prepare for a leadership role, he is referred to imc’s Social Learning Tool. The tool works similarly to a social network and aims to support the employee in topics such as self-reflection, networking and knowledge transfer.

Once logged in, the employees must first self-assess their leadership skills and set personal goals. Based on this, the tool recommends specific tasks. For example, participants are asked to share their own experiences, comment on other people's contributions, add their own tasks they are currently working on and expand their network.

Successful spin-offs after project completion

After the successful completion of the project at the end of 2019, the foundation "DEVELOP your career" was established. It is chaired by the former project coordinator Greg Carey from the Learnovate Centre, Trinity College Dublin. The aim of the foundation is to follow up the project and to conduct further practical and scientific research on career and competence development, learning interventions and methods, and work-related social and human capital.

 

imc is also co-operating with the DEVELOP Foundation and continues its work on DEVELOP, particularly on the Social Learning Tool. Learning activities created in the Social Learning Tool can be integrated into a course offered via the imc Learning Suite - as can be the leadership simulation game.

 

In addition, the former DEVELOP member, Joost Modderman, continued DEVELOP's work in his company SkillFull B.V. In cooperation with the foundation, SkillFull is one of the distributors of DEVELOP's Personal Learning Environment and provides, among other things, individual HR instruments such as the simulation games.

Video: Explore your career
Further information

If you would like to learn more about DEVELOP or are interested in a free demo, please contact the project coordinator uta.schwertel@im-c.de.

More information about the Social Learning Tool, you find in this PDF.

If you would like to learn more about the Leadership Game and Game based assessments, please check this whitepaper.

imc Innovation Labs

Learn more about imc's research projects.

Contact person

I have been working in the Marketing & Communication Team at imc since March 2019.

Communication, creative content and social media are my passion. "KISS - Keep it short and simple" is my credo.

 

To explain complex content in an understandable way and thus make the topic of e-Learning accessible to everyone is an exciting challenge every day.

Privately I love to read, play poker and travel a lot.

I am always happy to receive feedback or suggestions via: nadine.kreutz@im-c.de

Photo of Nadine Kreutz
Nadine Kreutz
Communication Manager
Featured Image LMS Hot Topics
LMS Hot Topics
Topic: Learning Analytics
Asking the right questions is key

The (ideal) relationship between corporate goals and learning analytics

When a company needs to cut costs, L&D departments are often the first to feel the pinch. Professional development costs money without providing a tangible benefit. That is, the lack of directly verifiable benefit is often cited. However, L&D organisers can disprove this assumption if they examine learning analytics in more depth. We are answering the most pressing questions on this topic and offer practical tips.

Infobox learning analytics

It comes as little surprise that corona has driven investment in digital training platforms and e-learning in general. Yet, this is not a new trend. Back in 2019, figures published by Fosway Group already pointed in this direction: More than 60% of the interviewed companies stated that their expenditure for learning platforms and e-learning contents had significantly increased.

 

Greater numbers of digital training courses and higher costs drive demand for higher quality learning content, while also intensifying the focus on the actual business outcome. What exactly are employees learning? What purpose does it serve? How does it help my company’s development? How can I determine the impact professional development has on my revenue, for example?

 

This is exactly where learning analytics comes into play. Here’s a quick outline of what that is all about, and how to map business outcomes in a meaningful way.

What does learning analytics mean?

The term “learning analytics” comes from the traditional IT sector. It means that data on learning and learners is analysed to arrive at decisions based on this data.

job application

Where is learning analytics applied?

Traditionally, learning analytics methods are used wherever learning data is generated. While different analysis tools are available, this is typically done directly in a company’s learning management system (LMS).

What is measured?

Typical examples would be information on the number of participants booked onto a particular course, the total e-learning hours booked in a given month, or the number of certificates issued.

However, this is all fairly basic information that offers little insight by itself, and should be linked to other reference points.

Icon representing 360 Degrees

How should learning analytics be used?

Things become really interesting when learning analytics is leveraged to look at selected data in relation to other data, and analyse it in terms of the business outcome.
An example: One region is experiencing a more pronounced increase in bookings for training courses and course completion. Yet, revenues are stagnating. Meanwhile, revenues in a comparable region shows strong growth after the same number of training hours. The analysis now needs to dig a lot deeper to draw sound conclusions from these figures.

 

The right questions need to be asked. For instance: How did the participants rate the courses? Did the booked courses match the learners’ skills level? Did the courses challenge too much or too little? What was the dropout rate? Did the course content cover topics relevant to employees in that region?

If the answers show a discrepancy between course content and expectations, this can be addressed directly. At this point, artificial intelligence (AI) technologies can also be integrated to develop recommendations for action.

How does the analysis with LMS dashboards work?

Learning management systems provide a variety of role-specific standard reports, which provide information on qualitative and quantitative elements of learning.

In addition, it is possible to select relevant data and use it to create customised reporting dashboards, for which automated generation on specific dates can be set up. The results can be visualised through pie, bar and line charts, as specified for each analysis.

learning analytics

Wolfram Jost, board member in charge of products at imc calls on companies to look at the relationship between business outcomes and learning content, offering the following summary: “Learning analytics must be leveraged to promote employee performance in a way that supports corporate goals and business outcomes. The value created through professional development programmes only becomes apparent when corporate figures are included in the analysis.”

His three top tips to get started with learning analytics and business outcomes are:

Photo of Wolfram Jost

Dr. Wolfram Jost, board member at imc

1. Less is more

Select data that is truly relevant, and use it as a basis for simple dashboards that provide a clear overview. Information overload leads to confusion.

It is also important to pay attention to data protection requirements, and to keep asking yourself what data is necessary for a meaningful analysis.

2. Data is King

While large quantities of data (massive data) are needed to run an analysis in the first place, it only becomes truly reliable if that data is also of a high quality and reports are generated on a regular basis. Continuity and regular data updates are crucial.

Moreover, data must be presented in a form that allows the relevant stakeholders to interpret the resulting data in a meaningful way to harness its full potential.

While data should support decisions made by people and data analysis is a useful tool for decision-makers, it still needs to be scrutinized. “Dictatorship of data” - assigning data actual decision-making powers - should be avoided.

3. Trend is your friend

One-off figures or reports say little.  Relationships and developments are identified by keeping an eye on trends. In which direction is revenue trending after a new professional development initiative is launched? Will the staff turnover rate decrease after a new onboarding programme is launched?

It takes time before this kind of information can be validated in a useful way.

With these tips in hand and an experienced data analysis team by your side, you will be able to substantiate the value created through your professional development programmes in the medium and long term, and optimise them in accordance with your corporate goals.

Find out more

If you would like to learn more about learning analytics, take a look at our webinar recording.

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Contact

I have been working in the Marketing & Communication Team at imc since March 2019.

Communication, creative content and social media are my passion. "KISS - Keep it short and simple" is my credo.

 

To explain complex content in an understandable way and thus make the topic of e-Learning accessible to everyone is an exciting challenge every day.

 

Privately I love to read, play poker and travel a lot.

I am always happy to receive feedback or suggestions.

Photo of Nadine Kreutz
Nadine Kreutz
Communication Manager
lms hot topics E-Learning Glossar
LMS Hot Topics
Topics: Informal learning

Informal learning:
Everyday hero of work

“Formal learning is like riding a bus. Informal learning is more like cycling.” What exactly does that mean? What makes informal learning a secret but everyday hero in the workplace? Nick Petch, Head of Learning Experience and Design Strategy at imc explained this in a recent webinar. We summarised the key facts and recommendations.

lms hot topics, informal learning

Last week, I finally got back to the office. For me that means: No more sitting at home all day! Above all though, it means I can meet colleagues without having to make special arrangements. A brief chat over a coffee or quickly popping in next door to ask how things are going with client XYZ, rather than having to pick up the phone or writing a message – such a relief!
While some still keep a critical eye on these exchanges and consider them a waste of time, it is far more than just vain chit-chat. It is part of informal learning.

INFO

In contrast to formal learning which involves learning pre-defined content at a specific time, informal learning relates to the learner receiving information exactly in the moment or at the point of need.

BUS OR BIKE?

Most of the time, this knowledge acquisition happens without us giving it a second thought or realising that we are learning. In actual fact, we all use informal learning all the time: We google for information, write Teams messages, consult Wikipedia – and check with the colleague next door.

Quite often, we remember the knowledge acquired this way better than the things we learned by heart at some point. That is because we process and use the information straight away.

Nick Petch, imc

Nick Petch, Head of Learning Experience and Design Strategy bei imc

Informal learning has piqued the interest of Nick Petch, Head of Learning Experience and Design Strategy at imc, for years. His take: "Formal learning is like riding a bus. While I decide whether to take the bus and where to get on, it is the bus driver who dictates where I can go and how fast I will get there.

Informal learning is more like cycling: It is entirely my decision where I go, which route I take, how fast I go, and whether I complete the journey non-stop or allow myself a break in between.”

Yet, the necessary awareness that such informal exchange can be crucial is lacking in many companies. Their focus is often limited to formal development opportunities. Studies show that this is not conducive. For example, the US American Education Development Center (EDC) found that around 70% of competency gains obtained in an organisational context come through informal learning. That only leaves 30% as a result of traditional personnel development.

THE CRUCIAL QUESTION

Achieving a balanced mix of formal and informal learning is therefore key. Nick Petch explains: “The two elements need to build on one another. Formal learning remains crucial. It helps people to learn how to learn. Learning is a skill that further enables you to choose when and how you adopt informal learning. If you keep on training your employees to sharpen these skills, your company becomes more agile and able to respond to changes or challenging times in a flexible manner.”

More specifically, this means that companies must train their employees to obtain knowledge as quickly as possible, and to map at least the basic concepts in a system. This documentation achieves two things: It boosts appreciation for the acquired knowledge, and it makes this knowledge available for other employees.

 

To avoid unnecessary log-ins, it helps to use systems the users log into regularly, such as the company’s learning management system (LMS). If the informally acquired knowledge is at least outlined here, shown in the relevant employee’s profile and a link is set e.g. from an internal wiki, colleagues can see who might be able to help them.

 

Yet, this is where we run the risk of going around in circles. How can an informal instrument be translated into formal structures?

ADVANTAGE THROUGH KNOWLEDGE TRANSFER

First of all, the principle and appreciation of informal learning must be anchored firmly in the corporate culture. A sharing-is-caring culture must be created. In other words: Knowledge should not be hoarded centrally in individual departments or persons, but must me available in a decentralised manner. Such decentralisation can also buffer the loss of individual employees. Companies that realise this successfully have an enormous advantage over their competitors.

 

While access to explicit knowledge including documents, wikis and blogs is important, so is straightforward access to colleagues and specialists who can be approached “on demand” as and when the need arises. Companies can leverage structures like Communities of Practice, Working out Loud-Circle, expert profiles or dedicated Teams channels to drive networking.

Uwe Hofschröer is involved in strategy consultancy at imc and confirms: “Companies are becoming more aware of the topic. Questions on how to create structures that promote such knowledge transfer within an organisation are on the increase.”

 

On-the-job training is certainly an option. This describes direct learning in the workplace supported by colleagues or tools like the imc Process Guide, an electronic performance support system (EPSS).

Uwe Hofschröer

Uwe Hofschröer, Head of Learning Strategy Consultant bei imc

The crucial thing for companies to understand is that you cannot merely push a training course that teaches informal learning. Rather, meta competences like reflectivity and problem solving must be trained.

In order to achieve that, companies must start by creating the right environment to promote informal learning. Our experts have compiled the key factors for meaningful realisation of informal learning in the workplace:

  1. Making informal learning visible in the system
    Provide room for the topic. Motivate your employees to get actively involved in blogs or wikis and share their knowledge. Utilise knowledge-sharing opportunities, such as regular feedback rounds after projects are concluded where lessons learned are shared and documented.

 

  1. Coaching & mentoring
    Conversations are one of the richest sources of informal learning. Creating opportunities for regular exchange is key. Coaching and mentoring can also be implemented across departments. Identify your early adaptors, i.e. the team members who get excited about new developments and strive to be the first to apply them. Get these colleagues on board to actively promote knowledge transfer.

 

  1. Creating an open learning culture
    This final piece of advice sounds a lot easier than it really is. It is, however, crucial. Effective informal learning is only possible if the company has established an open learning culture and the concept of knowledge transfer is firmly anchored in the mindset of every employee on all levels.
    Sharing is caring! Individual employees guarding their knowledge like a treasure they refuse to share with others must be an absolute no-go. This takes trust and autonomous collaboration. Flat hierarchies help to achieve this, while also supporting the creation of Communities of Practice. Providing the physical space for employees to meet, talk and make arrangements without additional hurdles also helps to create an open learning culture.

Once such a learning culture is realised in the workplace, the odd chat by the coffee machine should no longer raise any eyebrows, either. That’s exactly where I’m heading right now.

More information

The webinar  in full length with Nick Petch about informal learning, can be found here.

If you would like to learn more about digital learning strategies or about imc Process Guide, please visit the corresponding pages.

 

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Contact

I have been working in the Marketing & Communication Team at imc since March 2019.

Communication, creative content and social media are my passion. "KISS - Keep it short and simple" is my credo.

 

To explain complex content in an understandable way and thus make the topic of e-Learning accessible to everyone is an exciting challenge every day.

 

Privately I love to read, play poker and travel a lot.

I am always happy to receive feedback or suggestions.

Photo of Nadine Kreutz
Nadine Kreutz
Communication Manager
Photo of imc colleagues
Job Slot
Unique people.
Random questions.

Daily business:
Treasure hunter

Ivana Lee is Managing Director Asia, located in Singapore – sounds like a great title, but what does she actually do all day? We learned: Most times she’s in meetings and in contact with people all over the world and hunting the knowledge "gold nuggets".

Lee_Ivana
IVANA LEE

Job | Managing Director Asia
Works in | Singapore
At imc since | 2018
Superpower | resilient and never giving up
Favourite food | Chocolate chip ice cream

JOB & DAILY BUSINESS
Icon representing Office
Hi Ivana, thanks for your time! So first of all, please tell me what your title “Managing Director Asia” means?

It is a very broad role. Essentially, I am responsible for the performance of the business and colleagues in the Asia business unit. I’m involved across many functions like Marketing, Sales, Consulting and Customer Support. At the same time, I’m dealing with our headquarter in Germany and our partners, so this requires a constant shift of focus.

 

I enjoy this varied work and collaboration with people. It’s a lot of pressure and I have to understand what is happening across different Asian markets, how the team can react, and which areas need to be improved. There is never too little to do in a day, but I always remind myself that there is another day!

Please complete: On a typical working day I do...

...only need 15 seconds to move from my living to working space, since the pandemic. I wake up at around 7 am and then I really need a good breakfast and morning tea! Then, I check my messages and emails and start making a list of to-dos for the day.

 

I always ask myself: By the end of the day, which are the three most important things I’d like to get done? I also learned, that I cannot have to many things on my task list, because it gets overwhelming, especially on days where I have a lot of meetings. So, I choose only the three most important things and make sure I can cross them out.

Normally I often have 1:1 meetings in the morning with my team or customer/partner meetings. I’m a morning person, so I like to have all the important meetings till lunchtime.

 

After lunch, I go back to my computer and probably have more meetings, check my e-mails again, do some problem-solving. That’s more or less my Asia-work day and when Germany wakes up, we will get the right response. We always try to make sure we can respond very fast when customers have a question or issue. This is what makes working as part of a global team fun but also efficiently organising my time.

So on average, it’s not surprising if I have about seven up to eleven meetings a day.

LEARNINGS & HIGHLIGHTS
What is the most important thing you learned since you joined imc?

There are so many things, it’s hard to have just one. Being honest has always been close to my heart, but even so at imc as we are working with customers, partners and colleagues.

We build long-term relationships because the work we do are not just transactional projects, but the relationship can last beyond the initial set-up and implementation. Therefore, an honest conversation is essential. And it’s also very important to set and communicate clear expectations.

Your personal highlight so far?

There are so many, hard to pick one! I think the highlight for me is learning about imc’s key value proposition and being able to articulate it well to customers, partners and my local team.

I always compare imc to a treasure trove or a gold mine. Sometimes, the information is not so easy to find. But then you start digging and dig and dig and you find even more and understand things even better. And then you have to bring the “gold nuggets” or the treasure of the Learning Management System to the surface level and present them in the right way. If you do so, you can really be part of the growth story.

This is something I also appreciate a lot here: From the very beginning, I was really involved in some of our biggest projects in the region and it’s great that we can dive deep.

CAREER & CULTURAL DIFFERENCES
What did you do before you joined imc?

I began my career in professional services and learning in Vancouver, Canada where I grew up. The business offered vendor-neutral technology certifications specialising in cloud computing, big data, service-oriented architecture etc.

I moved to Singapore in 2014 and here I worked for a global company that specialised in the area of leadership development, service excellence and sales effectiveness.

 

Coming to imc felt like I was going full circle to support organisations and individuals from a technology and digital perspective. My passion has always been on learning new things, so that fits well.

What is the strangest thing you have ever experienced or learned in your job?

Germans drink a lot of beer (laughing). No, what is really different at imc is that the hierarchy is very flat, you can reach to everyone without feeling strange.

In other companies you would never get an answer from an CEO or something like that. I think that is very cool, but I had to get used to it at the beginning.

ABOUT ME
Do you have a professional or personal role model?

I think you can learn something from everyone, and it depends on what you take out of this situation. Also, I believe that depending on the stage of your life or career, one can resonate with different people.

I also think that while one can take advice from many people, it’s important to be clear about your own values, purpose, and internal compass to guide you through the good and bad times.

What’s the best way for you to relax after a stressful working day?

I like to take a walk and do some exercises, that helps me to clear my mind. But sometimes I also enjoy doing nothing, just sit on the couch and watch Netflix.

And, I like to organise things, a bit geeky, but like re-organising apps on my phone, that is quite relaxing for me!

What was the last book you read?

I love reading, but I rarely finish one of them… I’m the kind of person who starts a book, then skips some part, read in between and then go to the very end.

In terms of genre, I like non-fictional – performance improvement and how-to books.

The last book I read and am close to finish is one in the field of performance improvement books, it was called Sales EQ, it’s about the relation between sales-specific emotional intelligence and how to close complex deals. I also currently reading a negotiation book called Never Split the Difference by Christopher Voss.

Thank you very much for your time Ivana, and keep on digging for knowledge-treasures!

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job slot: instructional designer

Conceptual or instructional designer, editor for digital learning: there are many names for his job.

In this interview Philipp tells us what he really does and why he needs a lot of tact and diplomacy for some clients.

job slot: sales vertrieb

Team members who support each other and celebrate successes together: That is very important for Sales Consultant Vildan from Switzerland.

More about  how he came to sales and how he spends his free time in the interview.

IMC CAREER

Would you like to know more about imc as an employer? Then take a look at our career section, maybe there is a suitable position for you.

We are also always happy to receive unsolicited applications!

imc Job Slot: Unique people. Random questions.

Random questions, regularly new faces and jobs – that's the job slot of imc.

Contact

I have been working in the imc Marketing & Communication team since March 2019.

 

I am passionate about communication, creative content and social media. I live by the motto: “KISS – Keep it short and simple!”

Explaining complex content in simple terms and making e-learning accessible to everyone are challenges that make every day exciting.

 

In my time off, I like to read, play poker and travel a lot. 

I am always happy to receive feedback or suggestions: nadine.kreutz@im-c.de.

Photo of Nadine Kreutz
Nadine Kreutz
Communication Manager
LMS Hot Topics
Topic: LMS migration

Getting LMS migration right:
FAQ and checklist

When a new learning management system (LMS) is needed or an LMS provider vanishes from the market, sound advice is hard to come by. What other providers are there? And: How do they ensure that the existing data is migrated? What processes are needed for migration and activation? We compiled tips from industry experts, and summarised the key questions and answers in our FAQ checklist.

Icon representing Retailer Qualification

What should I focus on when selecting a new provider?

The new provider should have sufficient experience in data migration and offer solutions that address each client’s actual needs, rather than pushing a one-size-fits-all approach. Since a 1-to-1 transfer can rarely be achieved, it is crucial to find a provider that offers appropriate consultations and understands the purpose of the different data bits to ensure these are translated to the new system.

Moreover, the migration should be tailored to the specific needs of the company. While this might be achieved with a standard migration in some cases, other scenarios will require the development of customised scripts.

How do migration to the cloud and on-premise migration differ?

If the new provider offers both solutions, the client should not notice a difference. While the actual data transfer works differently, this process would be handled by the provider.

How does the migration work?

Migrations happens in several phases. Andreas Pohl, Director Research & Development at imc recommends: “It generally helps to look at migration as a project in its entirety. In particular, this is important when installing new software in connection with the data migration. This combination is crucial if you want to continue working with the required data in the new system as soon as it goes live. We divide such a project into a total of ten phases.”

These are:

 

  1. Consultation, analysis and definition of the data to be migrated as well as processing
  2. Specification and documentation of the migration process/format
  3. Script development by the provider in accordance with the agreed specifications
  4. Data and file preparation by the client in accordance with the agreed specifications
  5. Running the scripts in the test environment*
  6. Error output into a log file*
  7. Quality control by provider and client*
  8. Data and scripts correction loop*
  9. Execution of actual migration in the production environment
  10. Final verification & sign-off

*In complex migration projects, steps 5-8 are carried out several times.

LMS migration
Icon representing preparation

What interfaces should the provider have access to?

An experienced provider will have dedicated migration and import scripts to execute the migration for the client efficiently and ensure the necessary data quality. At the very least, interfaces relevant for learning management systems should be available: e.g. SCORM, AICC, LTI, QTI, as well as proprietary REST-API or other constructs to integrate or feed third-party systems.

Icon representing Process specific

What kind of data can actually be migrated?

In principle, (almost) all data can be migrated. The real question whether it’s useful and reasonable to migrate each data set. After all: Data doesn’t migrate itself. Migration involves costs, and needs precise planning and coordination. In an ideal scenario, migration is relatively straightforward for the following types of data:

 

  • User data
  • Learning history
  • Course and learning content
  • Training locations
  • Courses and programmes
  • Job profiles and competences or competence profiles
  • Test questions

When migrating data such as training and course history, the complexity of the content also matters. In some cases, standard processes can be used. However, if extensive information like certificate and competence allocation is linked, special scripts are required.

How long does it take to migrate my LMS?

There are three broad levels of migration projects. Level one would be a straightforward transfer of user data with learning history. This process can be completed within a week. Standard sets with import scripts are available for these cases, facilitating swift migration.

However, the greater the complexity of the system, the longer the migration process. That makes it difficult to specify a timeline without knowing the details. Generally speaking, three months can be realistic for data transfer to test stage.

The project duration also depends on other factors, and it is often not possible to estimate the time involved for each of them. These include:

  • Data complexity
  • Expected data volumes and their condition (data cleansing required or not?)
  • Dependency on functions not developed/configured yet
  • Development resources for scripts
  • and many more

To conclude, each migration requires excellent planning and preparation, as many factors need to be considered. Due to the dependency on external IT resources or third-party providers, it is important to document migration specifications at an early stage. If an involuntary change of provider makes migration necessary, data availability and access to the legacy system are even more crucial.

 

At first sight, this may seem like a big effort – but it soon pays off. Each change of provider is also an opportunity to leave legacy issues behind and implement improved processes. Above all, it pays to choose a provider with the necessary experience in the consultation, planning and implementation processes, who can also provide references for successful projects of a similar nature.

INFO

A legacy system refers to an established, historically grown application in the area of business software.

In case you have any further questions regarding  LMS migration, we're happy to provide more information.

To help you find the right provider, we also recommend our whitepaper on “4 steps to the right LMS – help with navigating the jungle of providers”.

RELATED CONENT
AI in corporate learning

Around the topic of artificial intelligence (AI) are many fears, anxieties and uncertainties. But what AI in the LMS can do and already does is mostly still unclear. We explain the most important terms and applications.

Onboarding slightly different

Already today, onboarding can be integrated into an existing LMS. But this is hardly ever used.

We took a little trip into the (near) future to see what a successful onboarding process could look like.

LMS Hot Topics

Topics, Trends and Tools all around LMS.

Contact

I have been working in the Marketing & Communication Team at imc since March 2019.

Communication, creative content and social media are my passion. "KISS - Keep it short and simple" is my credo.

 

To explain complex content in an understandable way and thus make the topic of e-Learning accessible to everyone is an exciting challenge every day.

 

Privately I love to read, play poker and travel a lot.

I am always happy to receive feedback or suggestions.

Photo of Nadine Kreutz
Nadine Kreutz
Communication Manager
LMS Hot Topics
Topic: AI in Corporate Learning

Artificial Intelligence:
Useful tool in Corporate Learning or a complete loss of control?

What kind of influence does artificial intelligence (AI) have on learning management systems? Where and how is it being used already? And are all employees about to be continuously monitored by machines?

These are just some of the questions that are also on L&D specialists’ minds as they consider the potential applications of AI in learning systems. And that’s more than enough reason to take on some of these questions and look at them in greater detail.

Andreas Pohl
A lot of the fears related to the subject of AI are unfounded.
Andreas Pohl
Director Reasearch & Development
imc AG

When it comes to the topic of artificial intelligence, there are a lot of misgivings. Losing sensitive data and constant employee monitoring are only two examples, and learning experts are also having to confront these questions as they develop.

However, imc software expert and AI enthusiast Andreas Pohl thinks it’s important to put things into perspective: “A lot of the fears related to the subject of AI are unfounded. Sure, there absolutely are justified concerns regarding ethical issues that need to be clarified, but when it comes to our Learning Management System (LMS), customers don’t have to worry about the possibility of an evil AI suddenly stealing their data or something like that because it’s not a thing that can actually happen.”

To provide a better understanding of what AI really can and cannot do and how it is used in our LMS, we’ll go over the most important concepts and provide concrete examples of their use.

MACHINE LEARNING

What is machine learning?

The term is used to describe dynamic algorithms that are able to learn and improve by themselves in such a way that systems can recognize recurring patterns, develop solutions, or provide advice, for example. And the more data that is entered, the more accurate the corresponding predictions.

However, it’s absolutely imperative to define, in great detail, what data is relevant and which rules should be used to analyse data and recognize patterns. In other words, it requires for human beings to actively step in when it comes to the analysis of data and the actual decision-making process.

 

For more information, visit DeepAI.org.

Icon representing Intuitive

What is machine learning used for?

One typical example of a machine learning application is image recognition processes. If you teach a machine that a triangle always has three corners and a rectangle always has four, the program will recognize this. It’s important to point out, however, that very exact parameters need to be set up and that if an image doesn’t meet those exact parameters, it won’t be recognized sometimes.

Where in our LMS does machine learning take place?

A typical example consists of automatic recommendations similar to those used by Amazon: “You like A, so check out B.” This is the exact same principle used by the recommendation engines in learning management systems.

Basically put, a person chooses the course they want to take, and the system provides additional recommendations based on this. In fact, these recommendations can also be linked to the person’s learner profile, i.e., their position, their development goals, the courses they’ve already completed, etc.

And the more data that the underlying algorithm has, the better its recommendations will be. This is one of the classic applications of machine learning.

DEEP LEARNING

What is deep learning?

Deep learning is a subset of machine learning in which a machine is able to improve its abilities independently and without any human assistance. In contrast to machine learning, people do not influence deep learning results at all, and instead only make sure that the required information is available and that the relevant processes are documented.

In fact, the machine itself carries out the actual analysis and uses it to derive forecasts and/or decisions without assistance on the basis of neural networks, which are connected to each other in a manner that resembles the human brain. Ultimately, the machine is able to make decisions based on these connections.

Now, it’s important to point out that this requires an enormous amount of data, and that this type of data is not found in individual learning management systems.

 

For more information, visit DeepAI.org.

 

Icon representing Intuitive

What is deep learning used for?

One typical example of a machine learning application is image recognition processes. If you teach a machine that a triangle always has three corners and a rectangle always has four, the program will recognize this. It’s important to point out, however, that very exact parameters need to be set up and that if an image doesn’t meet those exact parameters, it won’t be recognized sometimes.

Where in our LMS does deep learning take place?

Generally speaking, using deep learning in learning management systems is still extremely difficult given the lack of sufficient data. In fact, in order to be able to analyse specific patterns and processes, learning platform vendors would have to analyse the data from various companies together, but this isn’t possible due to the fact that this data is subject to very strict data protection regulations and policies.

 

One concrete example of an area where deep learning algorithms could be used would be learning style recognition. With AI, this recognition could be much more efficient than it has been to date, as it would work uncoupled from manual input and tests.

In this scenario, a system would be able to automatically figure out a learner’s preferences and behavioural patterns and determine the correlation for the corresponding learning results. This means that, from a purely theoretical perspective, your LMS would be able to determine what your learning style is and recommend appropriate content for you based on that.

What is the reality?

In order for the system to be able to use the existing knowledge on how to use learning style recognition to provide appropriate recommendations, all learning contents would have to be available in various versions, that is, as text, images, video, games, or audio.

Needless to say, however, creating these individual contents would entail an enormous amount of time and money, so this approach has seldom been used to date in real-life applications. However, it’s reasonable to expect that these topics will be pretty important in the future, particularly in relation to improving learning efficiency and learning in the moment of need.

CONCLUSION

In other words, a lot of the fears that people have in relation to the topic aren’t really relevant, or at least not today. However, when it comes to the subject of learning and AI, it will admittedly be necessary to answer ethical questions regarding applications in the future.

Or as Andreas Pohl puts it: “I think we should see AI as an active tool for supporting people. Humans must always be in the foreground of everything, and every single system must provide customers with real added value, regardless of whether it uses AI or not. And at the end of the day, we can always turn any system or tool on or off.”

 

More about AI and how it can also be implemented in the onboarding process, you can find out in another article of LMS Hot Topics.

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Onboarding slightly different

Already today, onboarding can be integrated into an existing LMS. But this is hardly ever used.

We took a little trip into the (near) future to see what a successful onboarding process could look like.

lms hot topics: stakeholder learning management system
Convincing stakeholders for an LMS

The success of introducing an LMS hinges on those responsible for the launch - and not under­estimating them. We have compiled some expert tips and a checklist to help you in convincing your stakeholders.

LMS Hot Topics

Topics, Trends and Tools all around LMS.

Contact

I have been working in the Marketing & Communication Team at imc since March 2019.

Communication, creative content and social media are my passion. "KISS - Keep it short and simple" is my credo.

 

To explain complex content in an understandable way and thus make the topic of e-Learning accessible to everyone is an exciting challenge every day.

 

Privately I love to read, play poker and travel a lot.

I am always happy to receive feedback or suggestions.

Photo of Nadine Kreutz
Nadine Kreutz
Communication Manager
[E-Learning Punk] Virtual Classroom
E-Learning Punk

Rock 'n' roll in the virtual classroom

Let blackboard and teacher's desk shine in new splendour

Virtual lessons are booming. The reason couldn’t be more obvious. Hardly an article out there manages to get around the topic of corona. It pays to remember though that online classrooms offer a range of benefits beyond the crisis. Lugging around heavy textbooks is not the only thing the digital sphere has made redundant. Flexible teaching and learning independent of location, joining lessons from anywhere in the world, acquiring digital competences as you go are all notable advantages of virtual lessons. So much so, that we feel compelled to take a closer look at the topic of “virtual classrooms” in this edition of E-Learning Punk. After all, digital teaching deserves a little extra opulence and glamour.

What is a virtual classroom?

The term implies synchronous, digital lessons. You could say that “live” e-learning is taking place in the virtual classroom. This means that instructors and course participants are in a shared digital room where they all hear, see and experience the same – just as they would in a real room. In contrast to a webinar where participants primarily listen, a virtual classroom allows active participation in the lesson. The focus is on sharing and learning together.
FUNCTIONS

How does the virtual classroom work?

Various functionalities simulate optimal student-instructor interactions in the “virtual classroom”. We summarised the top 5 for you:
Icon representing real-time communication

Real-time communication

Thanks to video and audio functions, lesson participants can see and hear their instructors, and communicate with them in real-time. The virtual classroom facilitates exchange the same as a real classroom does.

Icon representing interactive

Interactive whiteboard

Interactive whiteboardThis is equivalent to working with a whiteboard, blackboard or presentation board. Students and instructors can use this tool to create and edit content together – just like in a real classroom. The collaboration is key here. It boosts the sense of community despite the physical separation.

Icon representing hand raising

Virtual “hand raising”

By clicking on the virtual show of hands, a student indicates – as they would in a real classroom – that they have something to say or would like to ask a question. The instructor sees this and can let the student speak.

Icon representing virtual rooms

Group rooms

Small group settings encourage a particularly intensive exchange and allow different issues to be examined in parallel. In the digital world, participants can be split up into smaller working groups by using “breakout rooms”.

Icon representing feedback

Additional communication options

For the digital world, this final point is the cherry on top: Additional functionalities like anonymous surveys encourage more honest feedback than you would receive at face-to-face events. Chats particularly help more reserved course participants.

TIPS & TRICKS

What should I pay attention to in the virtual classroom?

Many people are only discovering this whole new world of digital conferences and virtual lessons right now. Time and again, we hear about video calls in pyjamas, involuntary sideshows and embarrassing background motifs. While proper attire and a quiet environment should be obvious, we compiled three additional aspects you should ensure in the virtual classroom:

Icon representing instructors

Well-trained instructors

It is important that instructors familiarise themselves with the functionalities of the “virtual classroom” tools before the first lesson. They need to know where to find what they need when live and be able to keep an eye on the chat at the same time.

Icon representing preparation

Preparation

The course participants also need to be prepared for the new situation. Providing a technical support phone number and communication rules in advance will prove helpful.

Icon representing didactic

Didactic structure

A teaching concept and course materials tailored to the virtual sphere will come up trumps. It may help to schedule an introductory session to overcome digital anonymity. Available interactivity options should be utilised to the fullest throughout the entire lesson.

SOFTWARE

Which providers offer virtual classrooms?

There are various virtual classroom providers – ranging from freeware to comprehensive professional versions, depending on the required range of functionalities and the preferred focus. Let us introduce three popular professional providers:

Zoom: especially in English-speaking countries widely used. Around 96% of the leading US universities choose Zoom for their virtual and hybrid classrooms. If you would like to try Zoom: Meetings lasting up to 40 minutes with a maximum of 100 participants can be held free of charge.

 

Adobe Connect: flexible, multimedia web communications and collaboration system that lets you create, hold and manage e-learning courses, online training courses and virtual seminars.

 

Vitero: emerged as spin-off from the Fraunhofer Institute for Industrial Engineering (IAO). The highlight: The user interface of the virtual classroom is based on the real world, representing a conference room where all participants are seated around the central workspace.

Directly integrating the virtual classroom into a learning management system (LMS) will help you facilitate a holistic virtual teaching and learning experience. This way, the virtual room can be booked directly via the LMS and participants can enter from the LMS. The LMS allows transparent tracking of attendance and learning successes. Vitero, for instance, can be integrated seamlessly into the imc Learning Suite.

 


That is why we’ll be speaking to Vitero in our next Punky Talk, and find out their tips for adding opulence and glamour to the virtual classroom.

The trends of the education rebellion

E-Learning Punk is an article and talk series for all L&D Pros who want to dare something and believe that digital training has to be colourful and loud.

Contact person

Since 2014 I have been part of the marketing & communication team at imc. My heart beats for creative campaigns, exciting content and digital innovations. My goal is to make digital topics understandable and simple to the point. My passions besides my job are good books and sports.
I am always happy to receive feedback on the series at vanessa.klein@im-c.com.
Photo of Vanessa Klein
Vanessa Klein
Senior Event and Communication Manager
lms hot topics E-Learning Glossar
LMS Hot Topics
Topic: Stakeholder management

Who is meant to pay for all that?!

Overcoming typical arguments against LMS and convincing your stakeholders

The introduction of a learning management system (LMS) is a landmark decision with lasting effect on company processes. Its success hinges on those responsible for the launch taking due account of their stakeholders - and not underestimating them. Each department has unique interests, requirements and perspectives.

 

Failure to involve data protection officers, works councils or the HR department in the initial stages can, for example, result in avoidable delays and unnecessary conflict. This makes it crucial to integrate stakeholders into the project early on. We have compiled some expert tips and a checklist to help you on your way.

EXPERT TIPS

The real work only starts with the decision to implement a learning management system. After a long fight for a decision, those involved are often highly motivated and want to get started on the provider selection and realisation as soon as possible.

Unfortunately, this frequently means that they forget to involve key stakeholders within their organisation in due time. If responsibilities, requirements and potential risks are not discussed at an early stage, and other departments and employees are left out of the loop, problems are almost a given.

Florian Casper, imc Data Protection Officer, cautions against ignoring stakeholders: "It is extremely important to know your interest groups and involve them early on. Works councils, data protection officers and IT departments all bear a lot of responsibility in relation to the processing of personal data. That makes it even more upsetting for these functions if they are presented with a done deal.

We have experienced on numerous occasions that LMS implementation projects come to a halt, because these stakeholders were not informed about the planned procurement. Early and transparent involvement of these functions helps to avoid unnecessary internal conflicts, ensures smooth and straightforward project execution and also prevents high additional costs that would be incurred through project delays or abortions."

Elisabeth Schulze Jaegle equally emphasises the importance of getting stakeholders on board from the outset. The independent expert for digital learning and agile learning designs often acts as a mediator between different interest groups and recommends early talks.

 

Especially in relation to the works council, she advises: "Successful LMS implementation for the long term can only be achieved in close and fair cooperation with co-determination parties, i.e. the works council. Especially in relation to the processing of personal data, the works council has a great say. It should be actively involved from the beginning, and can also be a strong partner for personnel development."

Clarifying the following questions in advance will help you prevent unnecessary conflict and delays:

  1. Who are my stakeholders?
  2. What potential concerns might arise in the implementation of the LMS?
  3. What are the counter-arguments?
  4. Who should be informed when?
STAKEHOLDER CHECKLIST
Management team/ investors

Typical argument
LMS involves costs, but does not generate profit. A good LMS helps users work notably more efficient and promote talents. This drives progression for the organisation. Costs are lowered in the long term.

 

Response
The outcome for the organisation is also determined through learning analytics. That means learning happens not just for the sake of learning, but in line with KPIs.

 

Timing and manner of information
The management team or investor makes the decision. It must approve the project and costs. You should therefore provide information on planned steps and realised milestones.

Tip: Create a business plan early on, and list effects for the organisation – ideally with clear KPIs (financial and efficiency indicators) rather than relying on soft factors.

HR department

Typical argument
1. Resources for the management of such a system are not available.

2. Employees (especially older ones) will not accept the system.

 

Response
1. Training already takes place today => There are no additional costs. On the contrary: An LMS facilitates decentralised organisation, as opposed to central administration involving individuals.

2. A good LMS can be adapted to the requirements of different user groups. Simple and intuitive operation also motivates older employees.

 

Timing and manner of information
The HR department is a central contact and should already be consulted when choosing the provider to clarify which data and interfaces are required.

Especially for internal HR and personnel development processes, the HR department should be involved at an early stage.

The system owner question should be given due consideration => It is often assumed that the HR department is the system owner per se. However, a dedicated L&D department is established in most professionalised organisations, which assumes responsibility for HR development.

Works council

Typical argument

1. Employees are constantly monitored and controlled.

2. Employees are not given enough time for digital learning.

 

Response

1. A professional LMS compliant with European data protection regulations facilitates customised configuration as required in works agreements. This allows the works council to define the data to be generated together with the internal project participants and the provider. The works council can also be involved in any communication including the releases.

2. A well-designed LMS concept saves employees unnecessary training courses, and develops them in line with their personal goals.

 

Timing and manner of information

The works council should be informed during the selection process for the provider in order to define the catalogue of requirements together with other stakeholders.
A workshop (ideally not linked to a specific provider) with an expert who can explain terminology and present the opportunities of e-learning in general and/or specifically in an LMS is recommended.

Remember: The works council has a legal right to stop the entire project!

IT

Typical argument

Available human resources do not stretch to implementation, maintenance and support requests.

 

Response

A good LMS has standardised interfaces that facilitate easy integration into the existing IT infrastructure. A professional service provider offers ongoing support. Intuitive operation prevents excessive support requests.

Cloud-based systems also simplify project design and minimise the use of IT resources.

 

Timing and manner of information

The IT department should be consulted during the provider presentation and before the interfaces are defined. Also check, whether fundamental IT guidelines (security, cloud, etc.) exist which must be furnished to the provider in the selection process.

Subsequent support must also be clarified with IT (e.g. Who handles 1st level support?)

Data protection officer

Typical argument

Sensitive employee data is collected. An LMS is not secure enough.

 

Response

A well-designed authorisation concept prevents data getting into the wrong hands. A serious cloud provider will guarantee compliance with data protection provisions. If an on-premise solution were selected, data would always remain within the organisation.

 

Timing and manner of information

The data protection officer has an advisory and supporting role. They should be consulted before the contract is awarded to review the processing of personal data from a holistic perspective, and be given the opportunity to voice any concerns.

They can also help to select a suitable operating model, and prepare the documents needed for data protection issues or requirements together with IT Security and the provider.

End user

Typical argument

I get lost in the system if left to my own devices. I don’t have time for e-learning.

 

Response

User-friendly design ensures intuitive operation. Micro-learning nuggets available on mobile devices facilitate learning on the job – during regular working hours.

 

Timing and manner of information

This group is often left out, even though employees are the very people for whom the LMS is introduced. That is why you should inform your employees about the planned implementation and keep them in the loop.

Many concerns and uncertainties can be avoided through targeted communication and training in advance.

SUMMARY

Above all, Elisabeth Schulze Jaegle recommends looking at each stakeholder - especially the works council - as a partner and promoter of learning culture and learning offers, rather than a stumbling block and time waster.

 

We all know: If key interest groups within an organisation are in favour of a project, this has a crucial impact on acceptance levels in general. Thus, open and early communication is the foundation for successful LMS implementation.

RELATED CONENT
Photo of Ioana Precu
Courage to the LMS - even as SME!

Not only big companies should have the courage to go for a Learning Management System. In our interview Christian Mai from S&G Mercedes Benz, tells about his experiences with rolling out an LMS in a Small and Medium Enterprise (SME).

lms hot topics: e-learning glossary
The big e-learning glossary

WBT, SCORM, Predictive Analytics, Blended Learning - uh, what? The first two articles in this series are a glossary for those who have felt lost in the e-learning jungle of abbreviations and technical terms.

 

LMS Hot Topics

Topics, Trends and Tools all around LMS.

Contact

I have been working in the Marketing & Communication Team at imc since March 2019.

Communication, creative content and social media are my passion. "KISS - Keep it short and simple" is my credo.

 

To explain complex content in an understandable way and thus make the topic of e-Learning accessible to everyone is an exciting challenge every day.

 

Privately I love to read, play poker and travel a lot.

I am always happy to receive feedback or suggestions.

Photo of Nadine Kreutz
Nadine Kreutz
Communication Manager